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Honeysuckle removal from pear/fruit trees?

Honeysuckle removal from pear/fruit trees?

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  #1  
Old 09-30-03, 05:48 PM
onourown's Avatar
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Location: West GA
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Honeysuckle removal from pear/fruit trees?

After slicing the palm of my hand with the pruning shears while cutting the honeysuckle vines that were ripping branches off the pear tree, I want to know how to get rid of it once & for all! The roots went on forever and I cut several roots that were 1/2" round. It has been neglected for many, many years and has firmly taken root all around my pear tree. What can I use to kill the honeysuckle that won't harm the tree and next years fruit? After I heal up (three stitches on the surface and one on the artery) I want to tackle the other fruit trees which have the same problem. That is IF my husband will take me off of "sharp object/tool restriction"! LOL
Sandie
 
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  #2  
Old 10-02-03, 04:57 PM
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Honey Suckle

Hi Sandie

HS is a real piece of work to get rid of. However you can take some porus ground cloth cut it in a 6 foot accross circle with a slit & a hole for trunk to come through. 4 or 5 thicknesses will kill out everythink under the tree.

Keep any shoots cut back & also put 4 inches of 1/2" to 3/4" inch lime stone gravel on top of the cloth. If you use this around your trees & mow the Honey Suckle down everywhere else you can control it.

The problem with using herbacides is it kills indicrimatly & you don't know all it kills untill it's to late. Vines can be tough but if you stay after them, they can be controlled with time & trimming them back.

Check around & find out where the landscapers buy their cover cloths by the foot, it's way less expensieve than a nursery. We got what would have been $500.00 if it was dyed & perfect for $50.00 you can find deals like that, buying begining run & end run rolls. 12 feet wide & 5000 feet for $50.00 I don't care if it's pink LOL. We got 2 rolls so I guess we saved $900.00 if it were black & perfect

As long as you keep it clean under the tree the leaves won't rot and start weeds in top of the gravel.

Good luck with your task.

Marturo
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-03, 06:49 PM
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Thanks for the tip, I work in construction and sometimes run into the landscape people, so it will be easier for me to find out where they buy from. Plus, how did you know that I have a pile of #57 limestone left over from the driveway and footings? LOL! Wouldn't matter to me about the color either, after all when you put the stone down doesn't it all become grey?!!

I know back in the day, the railroad people would come out and put diesel on the fence lines and it worked. They didn't burn it, cause they'd have cows on the tracks when the posts holding the barb wire up burned down! But with these being fruit trees and with the creek just 1/2 an acre away, I would never do anything like that. Besides, our groundwater needs all the help it can get these days.

After I get the fabric, would it be best to remove as much of the grass and weeds as possible before putting it down?

Marturo, I appreciate your help. Thanks!
Sandie
 
  #4  
Old 10-02-03, 08:04 PM
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Smile Site Prep

Sandie you can scalp the area with a mower if the tree roots are not hurt. Some interesting things have come out about viniger lately.

Even at 5 percent & you can buy a higher poentency. I tried the white store bought on Poison Ivy growing on Pine trees. I did not spray where we grow Fruit & Vegetables for fear of a soil Ph change.

Inside of 3 sprays in the hot sun it died, not just the browned leaves but the roots as well. So as far as the Pines they like an acid soil & look happy. This one thought, just watch the other plants for signs of leaf yellowing & then correct the Ph asap.

I read where limestone gravel has a negitive effect in worms getting into the trees, I just think it looks nice & holds the fabric down

All plant's will give in if you can prevent them from getting sun, so it seems the old ways work the best & last the longest. You needed something to use the #57s on anyway & this will look nice.

Marturo
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-03, 05:36 PM
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Very interesting about the vinegar. I think I'll just go with the fabric & stone on the pear & plum tree out near the front. I may try the vinegar on the pear tree in the back since it is younger & sturdier. I can run the soil pH tests at the lab I work in, so over the winter I'll take a base reading and then check it after using the vinegar and track any changes in the fruit. This will take at least a full season, but I'll be sure to post my findings so that others can see the information. I have to go to a jobsite tomorrow where the landscapers will be working and I will hopefully be able to get their supplier info!
Many thanks,
Sandie
 
  #6  
Old 10-23-03, 07:20 AM
iiMDii
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Check around & find out where the landscapers buy their cover cloths by the foot, it's way less expensieve than a nursery.

I thought about that but didn't follow thru on it. I should have....I don't know why I didn't. Now looking at the price you paid.....



You got a great deal. Good thinking.
 
  #7  
Old 10-23-03, 12:49 PM
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Location: Acton, Ontario, Canada - Zone 6b
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Horticultural Vinegar, Limestone, etc...

Hi Sandie, Miguel and everyone else

Hope you don't mind me adding my 2 cents (CDN) in...

We've been using Horticultural Vinegar to try to control weeds and have been buying the concentrate in bulk - the Material Safety Data Sheet and Label list it as 26% concentration and the dilution rate is 3:1, so the actual concentration of the acetic acid is around 6.5% - Due to Regs, we have to use product that is registered as a pesticide but I think that you have tried mixing lemon juice concentrate with household vinegar, Miguel, which should bring the 5% concentration up to the 6.5 mark if mixed 1:1 or so... Interesting to note that the label says that it will control annual weeds but only to supress perennials.

On limestone - I believe that over time it will increase the pH of soil if in sufficient quantities. I have limestone a tonne of pea gravel in our pond and dispite having acid rain (pH much less than 6.5), have to acidify our pondwater (untreated pH 8.0+) to keep the fish and aquatic plants happy.

It could be quite a balancing act to be applying vinegar on limestone to still maintain an neutral pH in the soil...

Btw, I believe that Landscape fabric is also often available thru the big box stores (HD, Lowes, Costco, etc.) as well as garden centres and nurseries, but you STILL couldn't beat the prices you got there, Sandie ...

Just some thoughts...

Howie
 
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