What to replace the tree with?

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  #1  
Old 11-22-03, 03:50 AM
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What to replace the tree with?

I have a problem, I just moved into a house with a very old tree in front of it. It's a black walnut and it's probable older then the town I live in. Anyhow in this town they have a law which if you remove a tree you have to replace it with another.
The lot in front of my house is probable 60 foot long and it's probable 40 feet from the street to my house. I was planning on doing a row of 3 trees running along the street but I want a tree that it kinda fast growing, and something that will last a long time. I also want something that will have high branches when it gets bigger so I can see the house, but does that depend on how I prun it?
Before anyone ask why would I get rid of the black walnut. This is why, when I first moved in the house I had some landscaping done to the house and the landscaper desided to prun the tree, well he cut all of the low branches off of the tree without asking me and now it looks like I have a telephone pole in front of my house. But this tree was going any ways, it's a total nightmare. The walnuts that fall from it are so big you need to wear a hard hat everytime you walk under it, if you were to get hit in the head with one of these walnuts, it would knock you out. Plus on top of that the walnut stain everything it touchs black, the concrete walkway in front of my house is all black and ugly. My new car has dings from the seeds falling on it. Then when fall comes hundreds of this seeds fall from the tree and it takes forever to clean them up. Well you get the point. I'm sorry this is so long but I just wanted to warn people of this tree.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-22-03, 05:32 PM
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Location: Taylors, SC
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If you plan to cut the black walnut, you may be able to sell it and get money along with the removal of the tree. It can be valuable for furniture grade wood.

Local experiences with trees vary, but how a tree is pruned determines how low the branches are. A check with your county extension agent can give you good local information on choices of trees. Good, hardy, rapid growing trees include: red maple, tulip poplar, sycamore, red oak, among others.

There is a bit of planning in planting large trees in a yard with so little space between the street and the house. Many trees are 20 - 40 feet across at maturity. A live oak really needs 50 feet as a minimum radial clearance to avoid heaving a slab, sidewalk, or driveway. Be sure to plan for overhead obstructions when planning. It is a shame to have the power company come chop the top out of your tree in ten years.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 11-23-03, 02:02 AM
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Thanks for the tips- I do know about the black walnut but being there is only 1 tree, its a little hard to get someone to buy it. The best offer I've been given so far is the removal of the tree for $100.00 bucks, if this was any other tree it would probable cost like $600 to get rid of. But I'm still looking to see who can give a better offer, I'm in no hurry to get rid of the tree as long as it's gone by spring.
I'm thinking about either a pine oak, sugar maple, red maple or this other tree but I don't know the name of it, it has yellow leaves in the fall. I'm going to wait to spring and see what is available and whats best for my situation and of course which is the fastest growing tree. Luckly I don't have any power lines to worry about , but who knows in a few years they could be there, and No side walks.
Some of my neighbors suggested, that I stay away from pine trees, which was my first choice. They tell me the wood is to soft and they lose big branchs to easily, is this true? They also told me to keep in mind to get a tree that won't destroy wells, water pipes and other under gound things. So I have alot to think about.
 
  #4  
Old 11-23-03, 06:41 AM
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There are many feelings about trees and their suitability for landscaping. I don't know that pine trees are actually any more prone to structural failure or dropping old limbs than other trees. Many trees drop lower limbs as they mature. This opens the space under the tree and enables it to focus on growth upward toward the light in competition wih other trees. You said that you wanted the lower space open anyway.

There are trees that are fragile and prone to damage from wind, such as: Silver maple, bradford pear.

Fall leaf colors are a pleasant touch for the overall plan for selection of trees and other plants in the landscape. I enjoy the intense, deep red of dogwoods in the fall. It is hard to beat the yellows of hickory and ginko. Red maples are striking in their intensity of yellow and red, almost as if they are on fire.

Selecting evergreen trees for windbreaks or deciduous for benefit from the light from the winter sun gives options for managing the way the landscape affects our immediate environment.

Some never think about the overall effect of planting trees. Some time and deliberation can give you a choice that will enhance your landscape.

Good luck.
 
  #5  
Old 11-23-03, 06:54 AM
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Thanks for the info, I'm going to prtint this and keep it in mind come spring. Spring would be the best time to paint a tree correct?
 
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