Desert Landscape

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  #1  
Old 12-05-03, 05:12 AM
Roberto S.
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Desert Landscape

I'm moving into a new house in Arizona. Right now, there is nothing but "sand" both front and back (82'x121'. I want a low water, reasonably maintinance free landscape , so I think a desert design is the answer.
What material can I use to keep the sand in place and "stop" it from blowing around?? Also, any other hints, or tips, would be appreciated. TIA for all responses.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-06-03, 05:12 PM
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If it were me.

I think I would take advantage of the ecosystem by using a plastic plant bed fence to design my paths. After I have things stablized it would be my $ & imagination on the Cacti I wanted in the beds.

Not having to mow grass & having nice clean sandy paths I would try to use all the open spaces filled with all kinds of Cacti. The colors & the outstanding Flowers that desert plants have would make a great low maintance yard.

That's got to be better than trying to create an East coast moist dark earth type garden, thay would just fry in the extreme heat.

It sounds like a fun project & http://www.hound-dog.com
has a tool for putting the black plastic path deviders in, without to much bother.

Let us know what you decide & try to find a Cacti person so you can get your plants localy even if it's a native of Egypt or of Africia.

Have fun
 

Last edited by marturo; 12-08-03 at 09:35 PM.
  #3  
Old 01-12-04, 04:18 PM
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Old 01-22-04, 05:25 PM
lil'buttercup
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Hi Roberto,

Do a Google search for "Xeriscaping" - this is the use of draught tolerant plants in landscaping. I'm sure you'll find many innovative and interesting ideas to help your desert garden grow. You're not only limited to prickly cacti! You'd be surprised at the options available to you.

There are many crawling succulents available that will form a nice spiderweb of plants over the sand, making for a pretty groundcover, especially when it blooms. Also using pebble or mulch paths is a nice way to keep the wind from creating a dustbowl of your yard.

Many citrus trees, grape vines and herbs (such as rosemary, thyme and lavender) thrive under the stressful conditions the desert brings, and can get by with infrequent waterings. You may even find success with some types of roses, as they truly love full sun.

Making friends at your local garden center is a great way to get started - stick to small, family owned suppliers who make it their business to know local varietals that will work best in your area.

Enjoy your new home!
 
  #5  
Old 01-23-04, 08:40 PM
Roberto S.
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Desert Landscape

I'm in the Sonoran Desert near Yuma. Anyway, thank you all very much for the super informative answers and links.
 
  #6  
Old 01-24-04, 10:55 AM
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Hi Roberto,
You're very welcome. Glad we could help.
You are probably zone 9 or 10. It would be handy for you to know your hardiness zone. Take a look here.

http://www.gardenweb.com/zones/zip.cgi

Newt
 
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