Sprinkler valves--plastic or brass?

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  #1  
Old 02-18-04, 07:42 AM
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Sprinkler valves--plastic or brass?

I havel leaking older plastic sprinkler valves (that turn on the sprinklers) by Watermaster. Could these be effectively repaired? If not, would it be OK to save money by replacing them with plastic, or is brass worth the difference in price? The weather here is mild. I don't know if that makes a difference.
 
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Old 02-18-04, 10:53 PM
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Hi Sondra

I would say since I do as much for myself & even pay more $ for a part or device, so I can rebuild them, that's my .02 .

Perhaps it's a frame of mind, but I get upset when the new Auto parts I buy, are not made as well as they were made, in 1972 & 1969 for use in my restored car & truck in 2004.

This is one of those questions & answers that have made us the throwaway capital of the World. I feel that we would all be better off if we could just buy quality & keep it going for as long as we can.

I do hope we get more answers on this. Just because I believe this is how a DIY lifestyle should be, does not mean I'm right on this questions.

How much for rebuild vrs replace? Are the units rebuildable? A few more questions & the change to plastic may be prefered due to un-repairable units. Ask more questions & check out the condition of the units you want to rebuild.
 
  #3  
Old 02-18-04, 11:38 PM
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I'm planning to hire someone to do the job. One person only suggested that I buy new brass valves and said that, plus repairing a leak in the system, will cost $600. Another man said it would be $400 for new plastic valves or $250 to repair them. Most people who have seen the valves have said they are cheap, old (I don't know how old; I've been here 9 years) and poor quality. I hadn't considered repair or new plastic ones till the second man suggested them. He said a kit is available for the repairs.

I want to save money, but not if it means inviting more problems. If people here have used the repair kits or know what the practical difference between plastic and brass is, I'd like to hear it.
 
  #4  
Old 02-19-04, 05:50 AM
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it would help if we knew the brand and model, and also the size. we use mostly 2" plastic valves. rainbird, toro, and hunter all make quality rebuildable valves. the cost of a good 2" is about 60-80 dollars each. yours are probably 3/4" and shouldnt be more than 30 dollars or so. your bids are mostly labor. i would only repair, or replace the one giving you problems. no need to fix what aint broke.
 
  #5  
Old 02-19-04, 09:34 AM
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Smile Question everything it's your home.

Decisions decisions at the least we can ask for more opinions before we dive in. Your on the right track & will get a good job done.

You said you were in a mild location so that makes plastic a good choice. First rule of old plumbing: Do everything all the way to the the water source. Filters installed where you can get at them without too much bother, are also a good idea.

www.rainbird.com has alot of info online & I have used their products to get our small speciality Farm through a 5 year drought. Thumbs up to rain bird products. There are better more expensive systems you can buy. Why waste money if you don't need to?

Kits can save money, just stay with the name brands & not the no name cheapies. Brass will last longer in nature but will have to be rebuilt about the same time the plastic will. Make sure the Kit or system has an easy to change a part design, not a glue together nightmare.

I have tried the patch N go method on both Autos & plumbing. I learned the lesson of the Domino effect. Change a master cylinder & the increased pressure makes the wheel cylinders leak. Install a new pump & tank then the faucets need rebuilt due to higher pressure.

The morel of my story is to try to get the job done right the first time. Anything you don't have replaced, have it checked throughly, so you won't have more trouble 2 Months down the road.

For the application you are using them for, you can use plastic or brass & get a satisfactory long lasting job. Garden Centers are good places to ask questions like who is good at instalation & who is not.

In the end you have to decide on price of parts & labor however a great part, is only as good as the crafts person who does the job. I have done most everything I need myself but just for the record. If you run accross a Jobber who tries to save you money by not checking or bringing your entire system up to like new Specs. Call someone else.

One last bit of advice, be part of your job. Don't get out and shovel but don't be a stranger & ask questions when you don't understand. People get cheated by not thinking of the people you hire as your employees. After all you hired them & are signing the check, so you are the Boss!

Good luck to you on your Job, I hope we have been of help to you, in making a good choice.
 
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