Rubber mulch for landscaping

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  #1  
Old 04-19-04, 04:24 PM
Sakscat1
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Question Rubber mulch for landscaping

Just wanted to hear from anyone who has used rubber mulch as an alternative to real mulch.

It seems some people find it "smelly" for kids playgrounds or flowerbeds...we would like to use it on a large landscaped area that is off the side of our house that we just don't have the time to devote to. Mulching every year with the real-deal is too time consuming so we are considering this as a time saver and overall money saver. It is an area that has two large bushes. We never plant any flowers in this bed.

Let me know if you have tried this.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-19-04, 05:23 PM
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Sakscat1,

Hey, I saw some of that 'stuff' a couple weeks ago.
It seems like a good alternative for an area as you describe.
If you don't do much planting there, then the benefits of a real mulch breaking down over time and enhancing the soil aren't truly justified. And it will help the ground maintain some moisture.

I don't think you'll find that much of an odor to it.

go for it,

fred
 
  #3  
Old 04-21-04, 01:02 PM
iiMDii
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Originally Posted by Sakscat1
Just wanted to hear from anyone who has used rubber mulch as an alternative to real mulch.

It seems some people find it "smelly" for kids playgrounds or flowerbeds...we would like to use it on a large landscaped area that is off the side of our house that we just don't have the time to devote to. Mulching every year with the real-deal is too time consuming so we are considering this as a time saver and overall money saver. It is an area that has two large bushes. We never plant any flowers in this bed.

Let me know if you have tried this.
I've used rubber mulch from www.stopmulching.com. People say that it smells poorly, but I think that smell goes away after the first week or so. I wouldn't worry about long term effects of a smell.

One thing to consider at $130 per yard, its coverage doesn't go far or at least as far as I had hoped. Another thing is that some mulch is not meant for playground as it is not entirely metal free. I assume 100% metal free is more expensive too. Before you buy I would consider finding out if it is entirely metal free as the mulch I have has some metal wire out of some pieces....I think they claim it is 98% metal free.

One bad thing about it in your flower beds is that if you pick a color, lay it down, get all happy about how great it looks, then the leaves from the trees start mixing in with the mulch, the color gets skewed. that's what happened to mine. It ****..bigtime! I have four large flowe4r beds with rubber mulch and after the leaves of one season mixed into them, I decided for the real mulch.

Check out that website....
 

Last edited by chfite; 04-21-04 at 08:24 PM. Reason: inappropriate language
  #4  
Old 09-05-04, 09:04 PM
djolley
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Have you considered investing in weed barrier cloth and then use something like pine bark mulch (mini, not nuggets)- much less expensive than rubber and it should last at least a couple of seasons. My new favorite mulch is a Red Oak bark mulch, once-ground. Holds its reddish brown color well, mats nicely and doesn't run-off in heavy rain. Put on heavy enough it will form a very effective weed barrier. I was at a plant show recently and a company was featuring an artificial pine straw (plastic). Looked very realistic. Not sure how well it would hold its color and wasn't interested so I don't know the source.
 
  #5  
Old 09-06-04, 08:06 AM
Sakscat1
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The problem is we have used some weed barriers before and thickly applied real mulch and it does not help much...we joke that we have "automic" weeds because they are aggressive and HUGE(and unusual). Our housing development used to be farmland we we wonder if that adds to the size and speed they grow.

We did not do anything this year because it was just too overwhelming. We would like to do it Spring 2005 before they grow at all. Thanks!
 
  #6  
Old 09-12-04, 03:28 AM
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I live in Pa and we had probable 20 ton of that black rubber mulch, we couldn't sell it to save our lives. Personally I would never use it in my garden but I could see how it would look nice in the right spot.
From what I hear out in Ca., a lot of people use this stuff for there gardens but over here it's not a big seller.
Myself I have a very large yard with a lot of flower beds and I also had the same problem as you when it comes to certain weeds being able to still grow though the weed barrier. What I've done to save money on mulch is to double up on the weed barrier and use stone as a mulch, it comes in many different colors and last for ever. You can pick up grey 1/4 inch stone for around $20.00 a ton. But they also have red , pink and white stone and many different color lava stones. The stone worked out great in my flower beds but I found that I still like to use real wood mulch around trees.
It's just a suggestion to consider and if you still have weeds growing though the barrier after doubling it up, I just pull it out softly and hit the spot with round-up and it never comes back.

If you were wondering what we did with the 20 ton of rubber black mulch, well it ends up that horse farms love the stuff, we ended up making the mulch a little finer and sold it all. The horse farmer lined the stable floor with the stuff and claims it's great for horses to walk on , time to time he calls us back for more but to cost to much for us to buy to make a profit so we stay away from that market.
 
  #7  
Old 09-12-04, 06:31 AM
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Here recycled tire mulch is a restricted product and wonder if it would be elsewhere.

There has been in effect a regulation that disalows the use of a certain amount of this product when it is exposed, but there was an incident near my home city that caused a tightening of the rules.

A farmer on the outskirts of the city had been hauling the stuff for several days to make a road surface to a new home site on his property.
He had finished hauling and had a lot of the material spread, when on a weekend, a road warrier decided to do some 4x4'ing in the pile of the stuff.
He got his truck stuck and in the process of trying to get out, his exhaust pipe ignited the pile.
It took over a week to get the fire under control, mainly with bulldozers, isolating the fire into smaller parts and letting it burn out.
The farmer got heavily fined because it was at that point illegal to have it exposed but now you really can't do much with it on the surface.

Article
 
  #8  
Old 09-13-04, 03:03 PM
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An alternative to conventional mulch is the wood straight from the tree trimming crews shredder. Being raw, it won't support plant growth for a while, until it starts to decompose. You can't beat the cost - free.
 
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