Grafting Apple Trees

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  #1  
Old 05-18-04, 10:48 AM
scolega
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Arrow Grafting Apple Trees

Whomever Can Help;
I want to learn how to get a apple tree started from a branch off one of my apple trees. Is it possible? I don't want to graft a branch onto the tree but instead I want to start an entirely new tree so I can plant it in the ground.

If you can help it would be great. Also can I start peach trees in the same way? I have one peach tree in my back yard. The other 3 died after 8 years of production. I want to start one from this tree before it is too late.

Please Reply,
Thanks,
Scott
 
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Old 05-18-04, 12:07 PM
K
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other than from seed you could try what i think is called aerial propogation.
find a young branch about the size of a pencil. carefully grrdle the bark only about 3-4 incches apart. peel the bark off. take a piece of clear[baggy type] plastic. put peat or potting soil[sterile] in the plastic. moisten the media and wrap entire wound. tie ends with twisties. you should see roots forming in a few weeks. when you see enough roots, cut it below the plastic and plant.
 
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Old 05-19-04, 10:57 PM
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I want to start an entirely new tree so I can plant it in the ground.

Hi scolega Welcome to DIYs Garden Forum

I have an idea that will save you a lot of heartache & make sure you get an apple tree that will do well for you, many years. You will not have to root the Chosen apple or primary Apple Tree.

You will have to buy or grow by seed the Rootstock of a Crab Apple tree, & then graft the Gala or whatever your choice is, to the root stock.

Of all my 25 Apple Trees not one, even a 1300th Century English Variety, has not been grafted to a proper Root Stock. For strength, Pest resistance, size of finished tree, ETC.

There is so much more, I would suggest you do some Googling & search Apple tree Grafting, Crab Apple scions, Grafting the Apple, Fruit tree root Grafting ETC. I have ordered from some of the Fruit Nurseries up in the Sticky we called ( Useful Garden Links ) The Tree Nurseries tell a lot about how they use this or that Splice to make a stronger tree. A good bit of info in there. The only thing worse than planting an air layered Apple Tree is, wasting time growing a Tree from a seed

I have only done 3 Grafts myself, but I can't wait to see them in 5 years. When you pay $45.00 for 1 Tree & it makes you want to make up your own Trees & save $$$ Many of the Nurseries will sell you the Root systems to graft to, & they know the right one for your tree.
 
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Old 05-20-04, 09:43 AM
scolega
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Thumbs up New Apple Trees

Thanks for the help guys!

I am going to try a method I found on the internet. I am going to try to start roots from an existing apple tree twig. There is a procedure I found that looks promising. This way it will be the exact same tree.

This method says to find a branch and cut it at a 30 degree angle about 3/4 the way through the branch. Then put some rooting compound on the cut and put some moist peat moss in there also. Then wrap the area with cellophane and aluminum foil. The cellophane keeps moisture in while the aluminum foil blocks sun light and heat. After 6 weeks there should be some root growth. We will see any way.

I also seen a method, were you cut a branch or scion and put rooting compond on the cut and then pace it in peat moss. Then put cellophane over the pot and place in sunlight the twig may start to grow roots and then into a cloned tree.

I hope these work. I will try and then let you know. If you have any more info please let me know.

Are the crab apple trees the most disease tolerant?

Thanks,
Scott
 
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Old 05-20-04, 09:45 AM
scolega
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Originally Posted by kerry
other than from seed you could try what i think is called aerial propogation.
find a young branch about the size of a pencil. carefully grrdle the bark only about 3-4 incches apart. peel the bark off. take a piece of clear[baggy type] plastic. put peat or potting soil[sterile] in the plastic. moisten the media and wrap entire wound. tie ends with twisties. you should see roots forming in a few weeks. when you see enough roots, cut it below the plastic and plant.
will this tree be healthy. Will it grow to be th same size as its original self. I will try this
Thanks
 
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Old 05-20-04, 12:05 PM
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Ps

kerry gave you a very good way to air layer. All I can add is buy some ( Dip N Gro ) this has given many the edge, in getting roots started very fast.

Good Luck.
 
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Old 05-20-04, 01:17 PM
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AIR LAYERING- thanks for reminding me of the proper terminology marturo. i havent done it since college but i remembered being suprised how well it worked.

scoliga, you should take marturos advice at some point in this process. apple trees must be alot like the oranges grown in the rio grande valley here in texas. the use the native orange tree for root stock and graft on the sweet fruit branches. the natives are pretty nasty tasting, and the sweet varieties are short lived.
 
  #8  
Old 05-21-04, 04:50 PM
k99
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Rooting Compound

I wasn't sure what rooting compound was, so I looked it up and found the following:

http://www.stretcher.com/stories/03/03mar24d.cfm

Homemade Rooting Compound for Your Cuttings
by Pearl Sanborn

Although store bought rooting compound doesn't seem to be overly expensive, most folks don't know that it can be toxic due to the fungicide included to protect plant cuttings from disease.

Just as in humans, hormones stimulate various functions in plant growth. The first hormone discovered to cause root growth is called auxin, and the synthetic version of auxin is what we find in commercially sold compounds today.

The willow plant is a natural source of auxin. Therefore, it can be very easy to make up a fresh batch of homemade rooting compound whenever you need to plant some new cuttings.


Gather a handful of willow branch tips

Chop or mash into smaller pieces

Fill small container with pieces

Fill container with water & allow to sit overnight

Remove willow pieces

Dip cutting into the water, covering the stem

Put cutting into your potting mix (or moist sand)

Cover with a plastic bag to retain moisture

After roots form, re-pot

Also, don't get rid of the willow water when you're done with your cuttings. Save it to water your plants!

If you don't have access to willow, dissolve a few aspirins in a jar of water. Aspirin is made from willow bark, so it can have the same effect as the willow water.
 
 

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