Bean seeds, are they true to seed?

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  #1  
Old 01-15-05, 11:42 AM
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Bean seeds, are they true to seed?

I understand that Hybrid tomatoes, corn, whatever, are not true to there seed, you have to get certified seed again.
But what about beans? There is a bean called "Fortex" (climbing French bean) that I dearly love, but the seed price is quite high. Can you use some of this years crop seed for next year or is it considered a hybrid, therefore "Not true to seed" ?
Changeling
 
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  #2  
Old 01-21-05, 02:00 PM
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I'd have to think its a hybrid. Have you googled the name for more info?
 
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Old 02-17-05, 12:10 PM
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Let's see here.... I googled "Fortex Hybrid Bean", but nothing came up saying it was. So it does seem at least worth a try to save seed from. Here is the link to google search if anyone wants it:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...an&btnG=Search
 
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Old 02-18-05, 10:43 AM
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Country Gardener, thanks for the reply, but I also searched the "Net". I thought this would be an easy question, but no one seems to know. My feeling is that they would produce true to type, but I really don't know or want to waste a year if the are not.
 
  #5  
Old 02-18-05, 04:46 PM
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but I really don't know or want to waste a year if they are not.
Maybe you could plant a few seeds from your previous plants, but mostly seeds from your supplier?

Oh BTW, I worded my last post wrong; I said "I googled 'Fortex Hybrid Bean', but nothing came up saying it was." I meant that nothing came up saying it was a hybrid, meaning not true to seed. If it doesn't say hybrid it generally isn't, but like you said, you don't want to find out by losing a whole year's crop.

So, if you had 1 or two square feet to spare, you might pant a few seeds saved from earlier plants.

Happy Gardening

Country Gardener
 
  #6  
Old 02-18-05, 05:03 PM
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Just looked it up on my seed supplier's website. It is true to seed!

http://www.territorial-seed.com/stor...P142316C24.cfm

The little "(OP)" at the beginning of the pargraph means open-pollinated, which means it is true to seed. A gardening buddy just informed me that territorial seed company has such info on their website
 
  #7  
Old 02-19-05, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by CountryGardener
Just looked it up on my seed supplier's website. It is true to seed!

http://www.territorial-seed.com/stor...P142316C24.cfm

The little "(OP)" at the beginning of the pargraph means open-pollinated, which means it is true to seed. A gardening buddy just informed me that territorial seed company has such info on their website
Thanks "CG" for the information, those are some expensive bean seed.
Now, I suppose you just let a couple of vines keep there beans until the pods have matured and turned dry, would this be correct?? This is what I did with bush beans.
 
  #8  
Old 02-19-05, 04:19 PM
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Originally Posted by changeling
Thanks "CG" for the information, those are some expensive bean seed.
Now, I suppose you just let a couple of vines keep there beans until the pods have matured and turned dry, would this be correct?? This is what I did with bush beans.
You are correct. You do have to calculate how many vines to let go to seed based on how many seeds there are in pod, and how many seeds you want.
 
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