Rose of Sharon shrub is bent over ...


  #1  
Old 07-13-05, 07:34 AM
Honeybane
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Rose of Sharon shrub is bent over ...

I live in central Indiana. Until this week, it's been pretty dry, but not intolerably so for the plants, because I water them occassionally. On Monday afternoon of this week, I noticed the Rose of Sharon shrub was leaning. It sits on the southeast corner of my house, gets tons of sun, and is very healthy. (Side note, I noticed japanese beetles on a purple leafed shrub of mine about 2 weeks ago. I sprayed everything down, and haven't seen the beetles anywhere else since.) This morning, now Wednesday, the shrub was nearly bent in half. The blooms are starting to open, the leaves are still nice and green, and the plant still looks healthy otherwise, it's just very unhappy about something and I can't figure out what it could be.

The soil is still level meaning it doesn't look like the roots are letting loose of their hold on the ground. The trunk of the shrub/tree is perfectly straight. I'm completely baffled at the cause.

Has anyone else seen this phenomenon? If so, should I be concerned? Is there anything I should be doing for the plant? Please send me an email with instructions as to what to do. I'm totally at a loss.

Thank you in advance for any suggestions you may have.

Honeybane
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Last edited by twelvepole; 07-16-05 at 10:31 AM. Reason: Posting email address or other contact info in signature is not allowed in forums
  #2  
Old 07-14-05, 09:11 PM
C
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Rose of Sharon is not the strongest plant on the lot. Evey now and then, one of mine will develop a lean in one of the trunks. If it gets too bad or ugly, I cut it off. The plants are quite vital; and will replace the shoot quickly. They seem to tolerate almost anything in the way of weather without succumbing. I would be inclined to stake the plant in position and see if it perks up. It may have become too top-heavy and could benefit from trimming.

If the plant is drooping halfway up, it may be the result of the spray you applied. Did the label recommend avoiding applying it to Rose of Sharon?
 
  #3  
Old 07-16-05, 10:43 AM
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About the only serious problem for rose of sharon, a member of the cotton family, is cotton root rot, which can kill plants of any age. There is no practical control. Cotton root rot is mainly a problem in alkaline soils.

There are different strains or species of Rhizoctonia (cotton root rot). The fungus usually attacks the lower stem or roots of plants. Small reddish lesions may be the first symptoms noticed on affected roots or stems. Further rot causes an above ground collapse of the plant as the water and nutrient conducting vessels are destroyed.
 
  #4  
Old 07-19-05, 06:15 AM
Honeybane
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rose of sharon

The shrub began leaning so much that the top of the plant was touching the grass. So, as the first reply suggested, I trimmed off the top 2-3 feet of the shrub. It sprang upright within a day of the trimming, so I'm assuming that it was only top-heavy. I'm wondering if just keeping the plant at a certain height would eliminate the problem in the future...? Common sense says yes, but it's always good to ask if unsure.

So what do you think? Keeping the shrub in a more uniform shape and size would prevent the heavy branches from bowing with the growing blossoms, right?

Thanks so much for your help!!
Honeybane

P.S. Sorry for posting my email.. did it out of habit.
 

Last edited by Honeybane; 07-19-05 at 06:16 AM. Reason: Added apology for email posting...
  #5  
Old 07-19-05, 06:31 PM
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I have several Rose of Sharon plants. Generally, I just let them go as they will.
Whenever a shoot leans too much, I cut it off. It is difficult to hurt a Rose of Sharon. They grow rapidly here. I have had them go from tiny sprout to 4 feet in a single season. They tend to become heavy with flowers at times. Pruning it was probably the best thing to do.
 
  #6  
Old 07-20-05, 11:36 PM
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http://doityourself.com/flowers/herestoroseofsharon.htm

This link on this website provides Rose of Sharon pruning tips.
 
  #7  
Old 07-21-05, 05:57 AM
Honeybane
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rose of sharon

Thanks so much for taking the time to respond. I'm very glad I found this site. I'm looking forward to using it as the great resource that it's proven to be.

Thanks again!!
Honeybane
 
  #8  
Old 08-04-05, 03:47 PM
jimmyjet
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rose of sharon problem

Every year my rose of sharon shrubs drop most of their blooms before they open. What could be causing this? I look inside and don't see any japanese beetles or earwigs (which I always find in the dried up buds left on the trees) YUK!!!
Is their any advice someone can offer?
Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 08-05-05, 07:54 PM
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Considering how durable a Rose of Sharon is, I would check to see if it is too wet or too dry.
 
 

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