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Be ready for lots of gardening questions and lots of pictures

Be ready for lots of gardening questions and lots of pictures


  #1  
Old 04-06-06, 10:39 AM
Z
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Question Be ready for lots of gardening questions and lots of pictures

We moved into this house 2 years ago and the garden was already blooming with flowers. But it's getting progressively crowded over the years. It's april right now and I really want to find ways to tidy up things. I've posted many pictures of the existing situation. Please give you recommandation. I dont' know what many of the plants are because I am not a tree hugger personally. But someone's got to do this right?


Here comes the pictures
 
  #2  
Old 04-06-06, 10:39 AM
Z
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Starting with the front of the house, this tree is slowly taking over the view and blocking the sunlight coming through the window on the left side of the house. Also can I trim off everything that's below the windows ledge (of the upper floor) so little branches won't be dangling so low





Now we go to the backyard. Should anything be done to this tree, it looks ok to me. But give your suggestion anyway





Here is the big mess, one of them at least

 
  #3  
Old 04-06-06, 10:40 AM
Z
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The one in the middle is a rose bush, how can i separate them again and how low can i trim them? I like it to be below the fence





This looks like spider web just sprawled all over






Same problem over at this corner too. They are fighting for space

 
  #4  
Old 04-06-06, 10:41 AM
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See how this one is really close to the edge of the flower bed. It's annoying when mowing the lawn because you have crawler under it with the mower






I don't even have to explain this one







Finally we have this tree here. It extends to behind the house and touching the evestrough. When the wind blows it makes loud scretching noises aganist the metal and my room is just around the other side of the house

 
  #5  
Old 04-06-06, 10:42 AM
Z
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Can the admin please fix all my IMG tags and combine all my posts to one?

I will go take another picture of the entire back yard to give you guys a better idea of the situation.


Thank you everybody.
 
  #6  
Old 04-06-06, 10:58 AM
Z
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Here comes more photo of the backyard.












 
  #7  
Old 04-06-06, 10:59 AM
Z
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Last one

 
  #8  
Old 04-06-06, 03:11 PM
gmapollyr
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You have such a great area to work with!

What are you looking to do? Do you want to do low maintenance or do you want to plant lots of flowers? Bushes? Trees?

I would bring color into the beds by planting lots of flowers. Tell us more about what you would like the yard to be like.
 
  #9  
Old 04-06-06, 06:19 PM
T
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Unfortunately, this is a case where the previous homeowner did not have a garden plan and had no knowledge of what was being planted and size at maturity.

#1 Tree planted too close to the house. You can cut off lower branches, but top branches will continue to overhang the house. To remove branches from this tree at the top or to lop off ends of branches will compromise the beauty of the tree and its intended growth habits. Homeowner did not plant according to size at maturity.

#2 The evergreen tree is a beautiful speciman for now, but it is another case of planting without any idea of the size it will be at maturity. Eventually both the fence and trellis will be in its way.

#3 Not sure what these bushes are. #1 may be a lilac. If so, older canes can be cut out and young ones allowed to grow. You can remove crossing branches and thin out interior of bushes by removing branches. Remove sprouts at base and cut back long branches to desired height. Soil looks like it is need of organic material and lots of preparation before planting flowers and mulching.

#4 The rose bush needs to be pruned. Again, this is a case of the homeowner planting these three plants too close together without any idea of growth habits or size at maturity or any idea of what species should be planted together.

#5 The bush in corner of the fence (forsythia?) was planted without consideration of its size at maturity and growth habits. Overhanging branches on tree can be removed. I believe this corner is featured again in another photo where the bush appears to be beneath the tree. A decision will have to be made whether you want to keep this bush as it is already cramped in the corner.

#6 Ornamental tree at rear corner in flowerbed was planted in wrong place. Trees are not good foundation plantings because of growth habits and need for room and large size at maturity. For now, thin by removing interior branches and interfering branches. Bed appears to need organic material and preparation before adding flowers and mulch.

#7 Bushes in front of basement window are planted too close together. Thin by removing interior branches and remove unruly, too-long branches.

#8 Tree touching eaves was planted in wrong place and should be removed. For now, remove interior branches and limbs with branches touching house. Remove the tree beside it.

#9 Trellis will soon be overtaken by adjacent plantings. Soil at foundation slopes toward house and not away. This directs rain water toward foundation and can cause moisture problems. The hose attached to the downspout lies within the bed and water remains in bed to settle at foundation. The drainage is a problem in this area.

#10 Large corner bed at fence will require trimming and thinning bushes. These can be used as a backdrop for perennials. Bed will require working in organic material before planting and mulching.

#11 The last picture shows again the lost bush in the corner where it is cramped beneath the tree. The bush does not have enough room to do what it needs to do. The tree does, however, have enough room. The tree will eventually reach a height and width where it will extend beyond the fence. Neighbors may not be too happy about the leaves that drop in their yard or the roots that extend beyond the property line.

You need your own landscape plan. Just because these plantings are on your property, does not mean that you have to keep them. A consultation with a landscape professional to develop your own plan would be worthwhile. A landscape plan can be done in stages to meet your time and budget constraints. You have a large landscape with many needs and it would be a good idea to get some help with making your beds as beautiful as you envision if you do not have the experience or knowledge of plants required to do so. A landscape professional will be able to advise you which plants need to be kept where and which ones could be possibly transplanted to more appropriate areas as well as which ones need to be eliminated.
 
  #10  
Old 04-10-06, 11:04 AM
Z
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Thanks for the reply twelvepole.

Anyone else want to take a stab at this? I spent so much time taking, editing and posting the pictures so some response would be nice.
 
 

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