soil testing?

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  #1  
Old 05-22-06, 05:04 PM
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soil testing?

How does one go about finding out what kind of soil they have?
Is it expensive?
deb
 
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Old 05-23-06, 05:56 AM
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Any garden center should be able to sell you a ph testing kit for $15 to $20...or you can purchase them online. Just do a Google search for "soil testing kits"
 
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Old 05-23-06, 07:32 AM
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Local tests here are $5. Find your local cooperative extension agent.
 
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Old 05-23-06, 08:24 AM
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Your local Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent can provide you with soil test kit and info re: soil amendments, grass seed varieties, and lawn maintenance schedule for your area. The agent can provide you with a wealth of gardening information.
 
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Old 05-24-06, 11:52 AM
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Here you go.
http://www.umassextension.org/

Newt
 
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Old 05-28-06, 08:40 PM
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One last question?

Thanks all. It is pretty affordable. I checked out the website given. Unfortunately, I have weird "non-grass" growing and all the basic soil testing tells is the PH.

I know the ground is wet and I have a moss/lichen problem in lots of patches all over the yard-
I just don't know what to do about it. Does it require I dig it all up and have a new lawn put in or is there a way to kill it and then somehow re-seed with real grass - ?any types that do well in wet soil without lots of sun? (plus- I'll find out the PH to help too)
 
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Old 05-29-06, 03:49 PM
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Traditional grasses do not grow well in wet soil. Few plants can tolerate wet feet. Moss and lichens grow where the soil is too shaded, too acidic, too compacted, or some combination thereof. There are many groundcovers and plants that will grow in the shade. Perhaps, grass is too bold an endeavor. Grass generally needs 4-6 hours of sun per day to flourish. Heavily seeding some bluegrasses will provide some reasonable coverage in shade.

It seems that your first task is to drain the area to provide an area that will not be wet constantly.
 
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Old 05-31-06, 05:49 PM
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Spikedog, I agree with Chfite. You will need to address the conditions that moss and lichens like before you can plant grass. Here's some info that should be helpful about drainage and eliminating mosses.
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pub...ons/PM1560.pdf
http://users.bestweb.net/~habitat/Co...the%20Lawn.htm
http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC2363.htm

Newt
 
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Old 06-03-06, 12:06 PM
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Hey there,
I agree with Johnct. Look in the govt pages & call your county ext. office. You can pick up a test kit with directions & mail it off to the state u. These kits test everything !!. When it comes back, a local Master Gardener will be glad to go over the results with you & make recomendations. This process will save you $$$ in the long run. By using the test results & the measurements of your lot, they can advise you on how many lbs & what type fertilizer, lime (sounds like you do need lime) etc. you need & help you get on a maintance schedule so you use it at the proper time of year. All this cuts down on waste and therefore cost. Also helps environment as it cuts excess runoff. There should be flyers/booklets you can pick up there or they can mail you with advice for lawn & garden pertinent to your area.
My county has weekend "workshops" for lawncare, prunning, weed id, etc. at local parks & neighborhood clubhouses - if you have time. Give them a call & Look for your state/county X website too.
-gnat
 
  #10  
Old 06-17-06, 01:47 PM
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Hi

OK, well, my STATE is good but my little town of Holbrook is not so great a resource for agriculture or anything else- despite its fairly high tax rate... but I'll get off a test kit ASAP- I've been busy being a "camp nurse" but that's done now... so I can return to my WETLANDS and see what I can get growing...
I'm pretty sure the snowflake bush I planted 'died' already- it was near the driveway and had a lot of gravel in theh soil~ such a shame as they grow large... I haven't moved into the house completely yet- so when I do I will SURELY be back to this helpful website for LOTS more advice and support!
Thanks,
deb
 
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