Leaves falling off the tree

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  #1  
Old 07-26-06, 06:56 AM
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Leaves falling off the tree

I bought a house in April that has a HUGE tree in the front yard...I can't even wrap my arms 3/4ths of the way around it...I don't know what kind it is, but I looked up some examples based on the leaves and I think it's maybe an American Linden. Anyway....I just assumed a tree that well established doesn't need to be watered. (I do not have a green thumb at ALL) but I do water my foundation 3 days a week because I live in north Texas where it's very hot, very dry and the area I'm in has shifting problems. The roots are going under the house and so I know it's getting water from when I water the foundation.

My question is, even well established trees many many years old, do they still need to be watered or will they get what they need from their roots being so established? Otherwise, any ideas why the leaves are all turning yellow and falling?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-26-06, 12:08 PM
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Advice from an Irish gardener.

If the tree is so large, posssibly it was there before the house.
Someone or something could have damaged the trees roots when the house was being built, driveway being laid or garden being landscaped.
In dry weather it could struggle to take up water.
I suggest watering it regularly and heavily.
 
  #3  
Old 07-26-06, 04:37 PM
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Hi Sanderson,

Congratulations on your new home! If your home was just built your tree could be suffering from construction damage. You don't say if there is a drought. Even mature trees can suffer during a drought. Leaves are expendable to a tree, so they will shed them during times of stress. You also state that you are watering the foundation, but I'm thinking you mean you are watering the plants around the foundation of the house, and not the foundation of the house itself. If the tree is getting supplemental water, and didn't get it previously, it could be getting too much water. Are there any spots on the leaves, if so what color and do they have a ring around them, browning around the edges of the leaves, etc?

You might find the info helpful from here.
http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/trees/TILAMEA.pdf

The leaves will show appreciable browning and scorching after a particularly dry season, but the tree appears fine the following year. It is often found growing along moist stream banks but tolerates some drought. Best located in moist sites.
Here's how to water a mature tree.
http://cals.arizona.edu/pubs/water/az1298/
http://www.watersaver.org/pdfs/FALL_..._FOR_TREES.pdf

Would it be possible to contact the former owner, if there is one, to find out if this has happened before?

Newt
 
  #4  
Old 07-27-06, 01:45 PM
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The house was built in the 60's and nothing has been added recently (drive way etc)

And yes...I'm watering the foundation...not plants...because we've not had rain in weeks...months maybe....and the foundation shifted and was recently repaird ($6,000) this is typical for this area. I live in north texas.

The previous owner bought the house to renovate and resell. Before that the neighbors say it sat vacant for a year.

There are several leaves that are covered with holes.
 
  #5  
Old 07-27-06, 01:54 PM
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Newt - its a good idea to water the foundation of a house in a drought wether in Texas or Indiana or Montana or anywhere else. You're actually keeping the soil moist around the foundation. Otherwise, you run the risk of walls cracking and/or bowing.

Sanderson - I think the quote Newt included says it all. The tree wants to keep its feet wet. When you water the foundation, leave the hose run around the tree. Better yet, buy a soaker hose to give a slow drip around as much or the root system (under the leaf canopy) as posible. Water it deep. Shallow watering is worse than no water.
 
  #6  
Old 07-27-06, 03:59 PM
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I learn something new every day! I had no idea and had never heard of that type of soil condition that would cause the foundation to shift.

Were you able to determine if your tree is indeed an American linden? Here's the pests that attack them:
Japanese beetle, European Linden bark borer, Linden borer, walnut lace bug, caterpillars, Basswood leaf miner, elm sawfly, scales and Linden mite. If you are certain which tree you have we can go from there.

Newt
 
  #7  
Old 07-28-06, 06:20 AM
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No...really have no clue exactly what the tree is. It has big heart shaped leaves with medium sized "teeth" or ridges on it. I guess I go ahead and pull the soaker hose out so that the tree is getting watered when I do the foundation. Thanks for the input!
 
  #8  
Old 07-28-06, 08:04 AM
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hello sanderson 4766,

i am in granbury and know a few tree guys that might be able to help. if you p.m. me i will give you some names. also, the forrestry dept. will send out a rep for free if you call them. they have been helpful around here in hood county. good luck and pray for rain. the drought has to break some time.
 
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