Blue Lily of the Nile

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  #1  
Old 07-27-06, 10:34 AM
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Blue Lily of the Nile

Starting to have problems with this plant. I planted it a little over a year ago and haven't had problems. It bloomed this summer beautifully and then I trimmed or cut the flowers off with the stems when they started to die out. That's when it got bad. I realized it was smelling bad at the cut stem part so I started pulling them out. I think that was the problem.

I can't find anywhere after searches on info on what you're really supposed to do with the stem/flowers. Was I supposed to leave it and let it die? The leaves are all turning yellow or brown now.

I stopped watering them as well as I'm thinking I'm overwatering them but I've been watering them once a week with no problems before. It says to water regularly during growing season...when is that?

BTW, it's in full sun so that can't be the problem. There's another one next to 2 of them that are bad. Planted the same way, the same time, watered them all at the same time, cut the stems/flowers the same time and that 1 is looking fine. Nothing like the other 2.

What should I do?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-27-06, 11:37 PM
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Location: Maryland zone 7
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The growing season for these plants is spring and summer. Once the blooms start to fade you should cut back on watering and let the soil dry between waterings. They also like good drainage. The stems should stay on until fall and removed when the leaves start to yellow.

From your description of the smell, it sounds like you have some type of crown rot or root rot going on. Fusarium bulb rot can be a serious problem which attacks both the growing plant and stored bulb. Usually introduced by an infected bulb, corm, soil, or even tools, the fungus enters the plant through an abrasion in the tissue. This problem is worse in warm climates where temperatures rarely drop into the freezing range and can persist in soil that stays 60*F to 70*F.

Avoid planting new bulbs in areas where the disease has been present. Unfortunately, there is no treatment for Fusarium bulb rot. Remove all infected bulbs and soil in the immediate area.

Newt
 
  #3  
Old 07-28-06, 09:13 AM
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Rats!

Thanks Newt. If I remove the bulbs and soil...I cannot plant anything there anymore after removing everything? Did I do anything to cause the fungus or does it just happen?
 
  #4  
Old 07-28-06, 09:18 AM
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Location: Maryland zone 7
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I know, it's awful. When I read what you said about the odor I felt awful. Do a google for Agapanthus + rot and you'll get some good sites. One site I found said to treat with a fungicide after removing the soil. You will need to plant something there that is resistant to Fusarium bulb rot. If you need more help with this lmk and we can pm.

Newt
 
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