Shade garden?

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  #1  
Old 08-13-06, 11:17 PM
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Shade garden?

I have a garden in front of my house under the roof eve. It is shaded all morning and some afternoon. The only thing that seems to grow well there are impatiens. I would like something a little larger and fuller. any suggestions?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-14-06, 03:32 AM
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I've had really good luck with Hosta's in my shady areas. I'm a long way from being considered a gardener, but I've found these real enjoyable once I get them started. There are tons of varieties with different color variations as well as size.
 
  #3  
Old 08-14-06, 09:51 AM
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Try Tuberous begonias

Try Tuberous Begonias. These are not your run of the mill small begonias you get in garden centers. These grow from tubers (look like bulbs) and get quite large. They grow well in shade and in late spring put on a wonderful display of large flowers that last through the fall. They are somewhat drought tolderant and need to be dug up and brought inside before the winter. They don't like cold temperatures but will come back year after year if you keep them warm during the winter months.
 
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Old 08-14-06, 10:00 AM
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Caladiums have pretty colored leaves.

Newt
 
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Old 08-14-06, 10:09 AM
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One of the goods things I've learned is you should take a trip to your local nursery. Look at what's there. They pretty much sort out what's for for shade, full sun, partial sun, etc. Each plant should tell you how big, tall, wide, etc. it will grow. Do keep in mind the season to plant them, otherwise keep them in the container until it's time. Do research on the ones you like. If you want one that's easy to grow look for a plant that will require little care. If you want one that loves need a lot of TLC, be prepared to spend the time.

No specifics but just some thoughts.
 
  #6  
Old 08-14-06, 01:13 PM
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I recently did a "google" on "shade-tolerant plants", and came up with a nice list of candidate plants - I have an area under my deck that is shady most of the day. Next step is to take that list to the local nursery and ask them if they have any of them (some are regional). I planted Hostas, Ferns, and Columbine so far.
 
  #7  
Old 08-14-06, 01:48 PM
nibsey
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Caladium

I planted caladium in that area around my deck. The plants are beautiful (I love the mixed colors), but they took forever to sprout. I'll know next year to start them indoors. They apparently don't sprout until it gets to 90 degrees or so for a good stretch....
 
  #8  
Old 08-14-06, 04:40 PM
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Thanks for the help guys, I googled hostas and I really like they way they look. Hopefully my local nursury will have them.
 
  #9  
Old 09-04-06, 06:49 PM
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Hostas are a good thrifty plant. You can buy just two or three pots of hostas from any store and should be able to divide them to double or triple the amount you purchased. And in three years or so, you will probably have more hostas then you will know what to do with.
Keep the snails away and provide plenty of water the first year and your hostas will be happy happy.
I love ferns in the shade garden, loraripe, columbine and hydrangeas all do great in my zone 7/8 garden.
And if you have a small spot that gets a bit of sunshine throughout the day, it opens all sorts of options to you...ornamental grasses, iris, japanese maples, azaleas, etc...

Good luck.
 
  #10  
Old 09-05-06, 09:39 AM
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I went to my garden center and they had never heard of hostas. Are they rare in southern california? Do they do by other names?
 
  #11  
Old 09-06-06, 05:45 AM
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Family name for Hosta is "Liliaceae" - maybe that will help. I don't know if they are rare in So. California - it seems to me that they would do well there - given sufficient water. You might check with a local botanical garden - they should know what works in the area.
 
  #12  
Old 09-06-06, 07:30 AM
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thanks for the help.
 
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