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when to trim SHRUBS and not lose foliage for season

when to trim SHRUBS and not lose foliage for season

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  #1  
Old 12-15-06, 09:14 AM
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when to trim SHRUBS and not lose foliage for season

I have some shrubs around my house, have no idea what they are, that NEVER lose their foliage. I guess they replenesh the leaves and shed old ones continuously.

Anyway, they are overgrown, and are blocking the vents for my crawl space. Bottom line, when is the best time to cut them back (more than just a trim) without losing all of my leaves for the season?

I'm in NC
 
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  #2  
Old 12-15-06, 02:05 PM
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Can you take some pictures and link to them for us to see?

North Carolina has hardiness zones 6 to 8. Do you know yours?
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/cropmap/ncarolina/maps/NChardy.jpg

Newt
 
  #3  
Old 12-15-06, 05:50 PM
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7b, photos to come...
 
  #4  
Old 12-16-06, 10:34 AM
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Ok, you are in the same zone as I am. I await the photos so we can tell what they are.

Newt
 
  #5  
Old 12-16-06, 10:56 AM
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  #6  
Old 12-16-06, 11:29 AM
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I think your first pic is Privet - Ligustrum, possibly Chinese privet. It's considered an invasive (just in case you wanted to know).
http://georgiafaces.caes.uga.edu/graphicsfiles/Chinese%20privet.jpg
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~chandler/plants/weeds_media/privet.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privet
http://landscaping.about.com/od/hedgesfences/p/privet_hedges.htm

The second picture looks like Cherry laurel aka English laurel - Prunus laurocerasus.
http://www.bomengids.nl/lente/pics/[email protected]_3319bloem.jpg
http://www-saps.plantsci.cam.ac.uk/trees/images/chlaurlvs.jpg
http://www.barronmind.com/clhedge.htm
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ldplants/prla.htm

The third picture looks likePpittosporum aka Mock orange.
http://www.onlinewholesaleflowers.com/pittosporum.jpg
http://hort.ufl.edu/gt/coast/pittosporum-2.htm
http://easai.00freehost.com/Usa/Pittosporum.jpg
http://cals.arizona.edu/pima/gardening/aridplants/Pittosporum_tobria.html

Now my question is how do you want to prune these? Do you want to cut them to the ground and start over, prune them into a tree form by removing the lower limbs or would you rather trim away from the back to allow air circulation to the vents (which is probably what I would do)? After looking at the links below do a google for each and click on 'Images' and you will see lots of pictures to get some ideas. You can use the common or botanical names.

If you want to just decrease their depth at the back side, you can prune the trunks to the ground. From this site.
http://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/envirohort/factsheets2/shrubs/feb88pr2.html

"Most evergreen shrubs are better off pruned in early spring just before new growth begins. When pruned toward the end of dormancy, evergreens will sprout growth to hide pruning scars and new shoots will harden off by fall.

Two basic pruning cuts are useful in pruning evergreens - heading and thinning. Heading refers to shortening a branch by cutting it back to just above a bud or smaller branch. Thinning involves removing a branch at its point of origin, which could be a trunk or the ground. Heading causes a proliferation of new shoots below each cut, and gives plants a stiff, formal appearance in the long run. Thinning creates gaps for light to penetrate thick foliage, and it results in a more open, informal effect that reflects an evergreen's natural growth habit. Use both techniques to control plant size and maintain attractive features."

This might also be helpful. Do read to the bottom where you will see laurel and privet listed.
http://www.plantamnesty.org/pruning_guides/pg_eastern_wa.htm#top

Pruning ideas for pittosporum:
http://www.gardenseeker.com/pruning/pruning_acers_magnolias_hamamelis.htm

Here's how to prune shrubs into trees.
http://www.freeplants.com/free-article-training-trees-into-shrubs.htm

Newt
 

Last edited by Newt; 12-16-06 at 12:11 PM.
  #7  
Old 12-16-06, 01:33 PM
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thanks, will investigate further.

I'm looking for ongoing growth control, plus a little Extra on the back side. I don't want to cut them to the ground.

Thanks again
 
  #8  
Old 12-16-06, 01:39 PM
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Location: Maryland zone 7
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You are so very welcome! For ongoing growth control pruning is the way to go. I would also suggest you prune out some the trunks in the area between the shrubs and the vents.

Newt
 
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