Mango trees

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  #1  
Old 06-05-07, 05:42 PM
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Location: south carolina usa
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Mango trees

I purchased two Mango trees from Stark nursery in 05. They are planted within ten feet of each other. One has lush green leaves over ten inches long. I noticed the leaves of the other were small, less than three inches and pale. Saturday I found the stem of the sick tree broken off within a foot of the ground. The leaves on the tip end were still alive, the outer part of the stem looked okay, but the core looked as though it had rotted from within for the length of the top section. Both have been cared for exactly the same.
We save all raw vegetable and banana skins from the kitchen and apply them heavily to fruit trees and roses. Have I possibly transmitted a disease to this tree?
 
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Old 06-06-07, 12:34 AM
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There are several diseases that can cause mango tree decline and branch death of young mangos. You can dig up the tree and examine the roots for root rot. You can also take a branch to your local Cooperative Extension Service to be sent to the state lab for a free diagnosis. Trees that are stressed from cold weather, drought, poor fertility and other stress factors tend to be more susceptible to disease. You Cooperative Extension Agent can provide you disease information and recommend fungicides.
 
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Old 06-06-07, 11:07 AM
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After three weeks of unseasonably warm weather in the latter part of March, all of the trees had bloomed and were leaved out. The jet stream brought us temperatures in the twenties followed by a drought here in upstate SC. So you are right on target about the trees being stressed.
Are the veggie and banana peel scraps, as far as you know, beneficial/ not beneficial to most fruit trees and shrubs? Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 06-06-07, 12:40 PM
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I was thinking about the mango trees last night while in bed and remembered I forgot to address the banana peels and veggies. Organic waste is best composted. The heat generated during the composting process destroys seeds, insects, and pathogens. A lot of heat around plant roots is not good. The nitrogen required for the breakdown of the organic material when composting would be robbed from the soil where uncomposted mulch is placed. If you thoroughly compost your kitchen waste and grass clippings in with some other coarse organic materials like shredded leaves and finely chopped twigs and branches they will make a suitable mulching material.

Young mangos can't handle cold temps. During the first two years, the trees should be covered to protect against frost and unusual cold snaps. Some wrap trunks with straw, foam, or burlap. Cold is definitely a stressor, as is drought, and stressed trees are more susceptible to disease.
 
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