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everyone else's forsythia is in bloom, why not mine?

everyone else's forsythia is in bloom, why not mine?

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Old 04-30-08, 09:26 AM
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everyone else's forsythia is in bloom, why not mine?

I have some forsythia that was purchased from a good local nursery and planted by a landscaper. As it was planted in summer 2006, this is its second spring in the ground. While all my neighbors' forsythia is 100% yellow, mine is half (or so) green). Is it just immaturity, or is there something I should do?
 
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Old 04-30-08, 10:12 AM
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Full sun? Well-drained soil? Timing of pruning? Should be done just after bush finishes pruning so not to interupt bloom cycle. Blooms occur on last year's growth. If pruned in late winter or early spring, you remove the flower buds. Immature plants do tend to focus on vegetative growth.

Some varieties of forsythia fail to bloom because of winter temperature injury. Over fertilizing can cause plants to focus on vegetative growth rather than bud formation. If forsythia does not get 6-8 hours of sun/day, flowering decreases.

Your comment that bush is 'half or so green' may indicate that there are issues for failure to thrive. Please provide more details re: care and maintenance and other issues that may be affecting the forsythia plant.
 
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Old 04-30-08, 10:15 AM
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mine and my neighbor's are (barely) separated by a picket fence; both are in afternoon sun. Neither of us does any fertilizing or pruning.
 
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Old 04-30-08, 08:11 PM
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Hi Eddie,

Forsythia blooms on old wood, so the blooms should be on growth that was there last year. It's possible that the nursery pruned the oldest mature canes flush to the soil and the ones you now have just aren't mature enough to bloom yet. I would suggest you pull back the mulch and topdress with an inch of compost. When you prune, cut the oldest stems flush to the ground within 2 weeks after the finish of bloom. After that they set their buds for the following year.

Newt
 
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Old 04-30-08, 08:39 PM
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I'm glad you posted again. Your forsythia has been buggin' me. It's the 'half (or so) green' thing.

Forsythia blooms before it leafs out. Did it bloom on the not 'half (or so) green' branches? Are the affected branches producing leaves? Are they dead? Are they still pliable and have life in them and have simply been set back due to frost? A late frost will not kill the hardy forsythia, but it can nip it in the buds.

It could be that you had a frost after the buds got ready to burst. Frost does not blanket or travel in a straight line. It kinda zig zags. Thus, the neighbor's forsythia on the other side of the fence was zagged and not zigged.

Another thought is if you watered the new shrub up until the ground froze? Roots continue to be active after ground freezes. If the 'half (or so) green' is the bottom half of the bush, then this could be indicative that the bush was still seeking moisture when the ground froze and the moisture made it to half (or so) way up the bush before going dormant, leaving the top half low on moisture and stressed during winter months.

I do hope you respond again, so I can quit worrying about the half (or so) green problem. Would appreciate more input from your green thumbs. And, what does your picket fence friend say?
 
 

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