Type of cherry pits I have.

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  #1  
Old 08-28-08, 11:42 AM
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Post Type of cherry pits I have.

Im not sure what type of cherry pits I have, so im not sure if I am going to have to take the shell off around the pits. They came from what looked like black cherries, If there is a such thing. They've been sitting in my fridge for a couple weeks now. Another Question I have is, Is there an easy way to get the see out of its shell without crushing it? Any help will be awsome!

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 08-28-08, 12:32 PM
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The problem with starting cherries from seed is that most cherries today are cultivars, or hybrids, produced from grafts. Should you be successful in germinating seeds and producing trees that produce fruit, the fruit will not be the same as the fruit that produced the seeds that you planted. This will take years.
Here's a link to another discussion: http://www.helpfulgardener.com/phpBB...ic.php?p=49940
 
  #3  
Old 08-28-08, 10:21 PM
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Well, I actaully got them from a friend who tgot them from his tree. He doesnt know what type it is either. All we know is the tree is old. He said it was there before his grandparents moved in about 40 years ago. I can only imagine the seed would be good
 
  #4  
Old 08-29-08, 05:45 PM
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Don't hold my feet to the fire, but I think they have been hybridizing cherries since about 1920 here, although early research tends to show that it was much earlier just not documented. My research does not extend back further than the 20's. The early colonists brought fruit trees to this continent in the 1600-1700's.
The desire to produce fruits that were most productive and disease resistant exists today and into the future. My grandfather in the 40's had grafted trees that bore multiple fruits--apples, peaches, and pears.
It is not a question of whether or not the "seed is good." It is a matter of the genetic history of the seed. Is it an 'old seed' and true variety or if it is a 'hybrid' or 'grafted' variety. You can not tell by looking at the seed. We do not know the history.
Not to discourage your trying to germinate the seeds or the years of waiting for cherry trees to become fruit bearing, but if we are all still alive, then we need some proof if the fruit is the same as that from which you chose the seed.
We are sure your seed is 'good.' We are just not sure of its genetic history.
 
  #5  
Old 10-19-08, 09:25 PM
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Hi Faiyne,

Have you considered taking cuttings and grafting the tree? You'll get fruit sooner that way too.

Newt
 
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