Oak Leaf Hydrangeas

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  #1  
Old 08-08-00, 02:49 PM
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There are three Oak Leaf Hydrangea plants in the front yard of our "new" house. They were beautiful when in bloom but now the blooms are brown, dried and dead. I just need to know if I am to deadhead these blooms now? It's been extremely dry here and they never got much water at all. I don't want to cut off the dead blooms if it will affect flowering in the future.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-09-00, 05:30 AM
Ladybug
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Do check with a local nursery which sells these in your area. In checking my reference books I have found cultural directions which say prune after bloom, prune to ground in early spring, let blooms stay and after they have dried on the plant they can be used in dried arrangements, and one that said remove spent blooms. They also say this is a 7' tall plant, a 3' tall plant, etc. In truth, it depends on your particular soil, climate, and cultural practices in your area.

Your local nurseryman will be familiar with the soil, climate, and horticultural practices in your area. A quick phone call to them should get you the answer for your area.
 
  #3  
Old 08-20-00, 08:04 PM
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yes always deadhead the oakleaf hydrangeas. Each year then prune or cut back in the late fall.
 
  #4  
Old 08-21-00, 03:45 AM
Ladybug
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You still need to check with your local nurseryman. General instructions are dead-head if you do not want to use dried flowerheads for arrangements. Northern zone says prune after flowering, winterkilled wood can be removed in early spring. General instructions for care of plant say prune to ground in spring.

Instructions for a particular climate depend on local zone. Nowhere does it say to prune or cut back in late fall. There are zones where this could trigger new tender growth making the plant vulnerable to winter damage. Not knowing where these plants are located i.e. zone; though it may work in your zone to cut back in late fall and be an accepted practice, it can not be done in all zones.
 
  #5  
Old 08-23-00, 04:21 AM
mikejmerritt
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It is so true that your zone dictates how your plants are treated.Every other yard in my area(deep south)has Hydrangea and most do not cut back with great results.Our growing season is so long(March 15 to December 1)that I cut mine back about half way after flowers dry to prevent wilting.
 
  #6  
Old 08-23-00, 10:34 AM
Ladybug
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Mike - I'll bet in your climate you have some gorgeous plants I can't even think of growing. Up here we go to minus 20 and all plants go night-night in October.

Of course, we can probably grow some things you can't so I guess it balances out but sometimes I am a little envious of that long growing season of yours.
 
  #7  
Old 08-23-00, 08:48 PM
mikejmerritt
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There are some things here I wish would go to sleep in Oct.The grass and fire ants are two that come to mind.Hosta,Impations,Ajuga and many others are very hard to keep wet for eight months.We are having a tough time now.We had more rain in "97 than we have had in the last three years.Candles melt in the shade.You get the picture.There is some good from all of this.With a little plastic,fresh tomatos at X-mas but I do wish to experience your zone someday.
 
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