2 part question! cracks and boxies

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  #1  
Old 04-19-10, 05:02 PM
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2 part question! cracks and boxies

1. I have several specimens on my property that have suffered form bark cracking. I realize this can be fatal, but they continue to flourish. Has anyone heard of a product to 'paint' the scar that might make it more esthetically pleasing...not tar?

I have 2 very large boxwood shrubs, exceeding 2' in width. I'd really like to move them but fear they will die in the transplanting. They are near a paper birch so to further complicate I have those roots as well. I could work with them where they are....leave them or risk a transplant?

John
 
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Old 04-20-10, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by virch View Post
1. I have several specimens on my property that have suffered form bark cracking. I realize this can be fatal, but they continue to flourish. Has anyone heard of a product to 'paint' the scar that might make it more esthetically pleasing...not tar?
Are you talking about a tree? What kind? How big?


Originally Posted by virch View Post
I have 2 very large boxwood shrubs, exceeding 2' in width. I'd really like to move them but fear they will die in the transplanting. They are near a paper birch so to further complicate I have those roots as well. I could work with them where they are....leave them or risk a transplant?
I've moved boxwoods in the fall and early spring larger than three feet. You just have to use the usual precautions:

1) Dig the "receiving hole" first at least twice the size as you expect the rootball to be.

2) Be certain the boxwood's roots have moisture (not real wet and not dry). Dig the rootball as wide as the "drip line" and undercut it at least 12 inches.

3) Get help because the rootball is pretty heavy.

4) Wrap the rootball in burlap (or someting like it) to prevent the soil from falling off the roots when the boxwood is moved.

5) After transplanting and fertilization, keep the plant watered.

The roots of the paper birch might present a problem depending on if the boxwoods are inside the paper birch drip line.

Or, since you say you can "work with them where they are", why bother???
 
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