Summer Squash

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Old 07-16-10, 09:11 AM
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Summer Squash

I have a summer squash plant in my garden. So far it has started to grow a few fruits, but they have shriveled up and fallen off. Any ideas of why this is?
 
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Old 07-16-10, 01:20 PM
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Is your garden getting enough water? Here in N.E.Tn. we're almost 8" short on our annual rain fall and my garden really knows it. All my squash has bushed out nicely, flowered but has really been short on producing
 
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Old 07-16-10, 02:15 PM
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I've been watering about twice a week. I did it a bit more when we had the 100F weather. We had well over an inch of rain this past Tuesday and Wednesday. The leaves aren't showing any signs of wilting. I even gave the squash some water this morning just in case that was the deal.
 
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Old 07-16-10, 02:39 PM
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You need to water everyday. You can also mulch, so you don't have to water everyday. I use shredded leaves and they work great to keep the moisture in and controlling weeds.
 
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Old 07-16-10, 02:42 PM
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Everyday is excessive. The garden generally needs 1 inch of water per week.
 
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Old 07-16-10, 02:45 PM
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It depends on the weather and the amount of rain. With all this heat I've been watering 2-3 times a week.
 
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Old 07-27-10, 08:46 AM
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No fruit on summer squash plants

Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
I have a summer squash plant in my garden. So far it has started to grow a few fruits, but they have shriveled up and fallen off. Any ideas of why this is?
The plant's flowers are probably not pollinated properly, this is a very common problem with squash if you don't have enough insects in your garden or the right kind. The squash plants have male and female flowers.

For squash fruit to develop, the female flower must be pollinated with pollen from a male flower. Typically, bees and other pollinators perform this job, but if your yields are low or nonexistent, you can step in and help.

Identifying the Female

First you'll need to learn how to identify male and female squash flowers and have a basic understanding of each flower's anatomy.

A female flower has a small immature fruit right behind it.

Inside the female flower you'll notice a stigma—the smooth, slightly sticky, bulbous female organ.

Identifying the Male

Male flowers have straight stems and no baby fruit.

Look inside the male flower for the anthers—Q-tip-shaped reproductive organs covered in powdery pollen.

Finding the Flowers

Now that you have a more intimate knowledge of your squash, you can make like a bumblebee and start pollinating.

Male and female squash flowers open for one day only. You'll get the best results if you pollinate the female flowers in the morning.

Pick a male flower and peel back the petals. Using a small brush, like an inexpensive artist's paintbrush, collect some of the pollen from the anthers of the male and lightly brush it onto the stigma of a female flower, leaving a dose of pollen behind.

You can use one male flower to pollinate up to three female flowers. If know your pollination efforts were successful you'll know in a few days when the immature fruit begins to grow and the female flower falls off.
 
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