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Garden calendar for planting & harvest times?

Garden calendar for planting & harvest times?

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  #1  
Old 07-17-10, 04:09 AM
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Question Garden calendar for planting & harvest times?

Im planning a new, larger garden (N. Texas) and want to get things a bit organized before I start. Im trying to list out the things to plant and things that should be ready to harvest for each month.

Anyone else do this?

Im wanting a fall garden as well, with broccoli, lettuce and cucumber, maybe some tomatoes too.

What plants do you generally get vegetables from all season long, right up until first frost?

For things like cucumbers and squash, once planted, wont they continue to produce without planting new seeds?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-17-10, 01:54 PM
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Ooooh yes, my wife does it! We have a garden all the way up to past frost with the collards, etc. She gets most of her information (cataloged and appropriate binders for reference by her) from the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service. You may have the same results by googling the Extension services near "nowhere" to see if they have such information.
The hardier "cole" plants such as collards, broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, and some in-ground crops will produce well up to frost. Always leave your collards until after the first hard frost. The plant senses it is dying and will produce a burst of sugar to try to stay alive. Then is when you want to pick it. Sweet.
Tomatoes won't work well after day heating is gone, and the season is probably 90 days, so you have to be on top of the early frost and plant just after it is gone in order to make them.
All garden plants will need replanting each year. None that I know of will reproduce themselves, except heirloom plants, but winter will kill them off.
 
  #3  
Old 07-17-10, 02:26 PM
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Good advice in Chandler's post. His best advice is to check with your local extension. They can provide you with optimum planting times and also recommend veggies that do well in your area.

There are some perrenial vegetables depending on your grow zone. I grow asparagas and it comes back every year. So does rhubarb (veggie, fruit, herb?) and I think artichokes will return. There are probably others but the only one that I grow is asparagas.
 
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Old 07-17-10, 05:36 PM
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That's right. I forgot about asparagus. Better find a permanent place for it, as it keeps on a comin' up.
 
  #5  
Old 07-17-10, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
That's right. I forgot about asparagus. Better find a permanent place for it, as it keeps on a comin' up.
It can't come up fast enough. Steamed asparagus, sauted asparagas, roasted asparagus, and my favorite, grilled asparagas with garlic and lots of pepper.

Also good on pizza. As in shrimp and asparagas pizza. You'll be surprised.
 
  #6  
Old 07-18-10, 07:18 AM
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Boiled asparagas resembles bodily excrement from the nose, BUT, grilled asparagus, you'd better plant an acre of it. Love it! Had to eat it one time as a "vegetable of the day" from a hoity toity restaurant. Never thought asparagus would be "it". Maybe green beans. I'll have to try it with garlic on the grill.
 
  #7  
Old 07-18-10, 09:01 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Boiled asparagas resembles bodily excrement from the nose, BUT, grilled asparagus, you'd better plant an acre of it. Love it! Had to eat it one time as a "vegetable of the day" from a hoity toity restaurant. Never thought asparagus would be "it". Maybe green beans. I'll have to try it with garlic on the grill.
Lube it up with olive oil and grill it over medium hot coals. It takes some practice to get it a bit charred on the outside and still crunchy (limp asparagas sux). I usuall serve it sprinkled with garlic chips. Slice the garlic across the clove very thin and deep fry until they are golden brown.

It's all part of getting old (or maybe just growing up). I can't imagine eating stuff like asparagas, broccolli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts 30 years ago.

I still won't eat okra though.
 
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