Blossem end rot

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  #1  
Old 07-17-10, 08:00 AM
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Blossem end rot

I've raised tomatoes for years and have never had this problem. This year I planted two beefsteak tomato plants in large planters on my deck. I used potting soil. I water daily and feed them with Miracle gro weekly. The same regimen I use on my ground plants.

I did a little research and found that the problem is caused by a calcium deficiency but I haven't been able to come up with a cure. I have sat on my deck all summer watching these things grow. Both plants are otherwise very healthy and loaded with fruit. In my mind there is nothing like a perfectly ripe beefsteak right off the vine. Now it looks like that may never happen.

Anyone have a fix?
 
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Old 07-17-10, 09:41 AM
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If it's from a calcium deficiency, have you added calcium to the soil?

I don't know if you saw this link in your searching, but it seems to have some helpful information. http://www.veggiegardeningtips.com/t...ossom-end-rot/

I don't think this is related to your end rot problem, but you shouldn't water every day. Typically your plants need 1" of water of every week. It is best to water deeply about twice per week. Obviously if the weather has been really hot, they probably need it more often. This will ensure the roots of the plants grow deep and they will be able to better withstand dry spells.
 
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Old 07-17-10, 12:03 PM
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I did read that article while surfing around and I didn't find it particularly helpful. I looked around at a big box garden dept today and I could not find a fertilizer or soil amendment that had calcium listed as one of the ingredients. I would have thought bone meal. Even the tomato fertilizers don't list calcium.

As for watering, I water all my hanging and potted plants (probably 20-25) daily with the exception of a few that require less. As I said, my tomato plants are otherwise healthy and have no indication of overwatering.
An inch of water a week is probably a good rule of thumb, but experience is a better measure. Many of my plants are in large unfired pots or the hanging moss pots and they dry out in the sun and wind. If I don't water daily during mid summer by the end of the day everything except the cactus are drooping.
 
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Old 07-17-10, 01:46 PM
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I didn't read the article, so it may have touched on this, BUT, my wife, bless her organic heart, uses a teaspoon of Epson salt about 3" away from the vine and waters it in. It works and no chemicals.
 
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Old 07-17-10, 02:19 PM
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Chandler - After my initial response I took a trip to my local garden supply. The guy there said that he had some products but since I only had a couple of plants he recommended either crushed calcium supplements (Caltrate) or Epsom salts! I happen to have both. I'm going to try one on each plant and try to determine which works best.

If they work I'll post the results.
 
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