watering

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  #1  
Old 12-27-00, 12:56 PM
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We just moved into a new home with a big backyard . . . we plan to grow a small vegetable garden (200 sq ft) (carrots, cucumbers, potatoes, etc.) we are bringing in some top soil (the clay here is murder) . . .we are putting in irrigation for the rest of the yard and would like to know what you would suggest for our garden . . . we are new to dallas and the weather can get pretty hot . . . in addition to a spigot, should we put in some drip lines? Help, I am a rookie at this!

thanks,

B Berrett
 
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Old 01-10-01, 11:17 AM
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So am I, but I have been studing up on this for my own garden. What I have found is that drip irrigation is the best for plants since you can get the water right to the roots and keep it off the foliage. Water on the foliage can cause mold and damage your plant. You also have less vaporizion. I would also put a timer on it so that you never forget to water them.
 
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Old 01-10-01, 02:20 PM
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This will also help your watering needs:

In my SOLID CLAY soil (Athens, GA), I simply covered it with a few layers of newspaper then followed up with wheat straw. After pulling only a few wheat seedlings, my garden was nicely mulched for the remainer of the season, and with occasional watering the underlying clay remained moist and (gasp) soft! I was able to trowel right into it. It was previouly hard-as-concrete clay based lawn. I grew so many tomatoes on this that I was giving them away!
 
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