Planting roses depth

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  #1  
Old 05-16-15, 07:06 PM
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Planting roses depth

It's rather ambiguous on planting depth. Are these right, or too shallow?
The beginning of the roots are about a half inch below the ground level...

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Last edited by PJmax; 05-16-15 at 09:05 PM. Reason: reoriented pictures
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Old 05-17-15, 12:41 AM
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I am about as far from being an expert with roses as is possible. I DO, however, think you have the graft too high. In my UN-expert opinion the bottom of the graft should be no higher than about one inch above the soil. On the other hand, you do not want the graft to be buried as it will encourage sprouting of the native root stock.

I may be entirely wrong and if so someone more knowledgeable will correct me.
 
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Old 05-17-15, 03:29 AM
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Is it a Hybrid Tea Rose ?
 
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Old 05-17-15, 05:53 AM
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I agree with Furd, they should be set with only about 1/2 to 1" showing above grade. More importantly the hole must be at least twice as wide as the root ball, and the root ball needs to be spread as laterally as possible while you place it in the hole without stressing the roots. Just placing the ball in the ground may allow the plant to be top heavy initially.

Edit: I'm not the expert. Wifey gave you that information.
 
  #5  
Old 05-18-15, 07:50 PM
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No expert here but I have grown a small variety of floribundas, teas, climbers and of course those lovely creations of David Austin.

I agree - the trunk should be set much lower. And when you spread out the roots when you replant it, make sure they're not compacted or tangled up tightly. Many of the nurseries have stock that stays far too long in pots and the roots become too compacted. If they're not spread out when planting, they don't get as much moisture as the plant needs, and sometimes you lose them.

I learned that the hard way with mums.
 
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