Bush for boundary

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-28-16, 07:15 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 129
Bush for boundary

I need to plant some bush/shrub to mark the boundary . I am assuming it will be cheaper than installing vinyl fence . What type of plant should I select and how far apart should those be planted to have a thick fence.

I am in New England (lot of snow and hard winter)
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-28-16, 07:28 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,562
I like evergreens on a boundary so there isn't just some dead looking, leafless plant half the year. How far apart depends on the specific plant and that would partially depend on how much height you want.
 
  #3  
Old 03-28-16, 08:16 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 129
Thanks. I am actually looking for suggestion on which plant should be the right one (I am novice about plants) . Height should be about 4' -- not too tall since that will block sunlight
 
  #4  
Old 03-28-16, 02:10 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,541
I'd recommend going to a local nursery and talking with them along with seeing what they have. They will be knowledgeable as to what grows well in your area.
 
  #5  
Old 03-28-16, 02:33 PM
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
I don't see how a plant marks a boundary. However, if you still want to use a plant, get a plant with thorns or what we used to call a sticker bush.
 
  #6  
Old 03-28-16, 02:43 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,541
Pulpo, plantings are often used to 'mark' or define the boundary line. Think of all the hedge rows you've seen a long a property line.
 
  #7  
Old 03-28-16, 03:26 PM
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,986
Pulpo, plantings are often used to 'mark' or define the boundary line. Think of all the hedge rows you've seen a long a property line.
I didn't see the word 'row'. A row of bushes can cost as much as a fence. Many of the "rows" that you mentioned are used for privacy.
 
  #8  
Old 03-28-16, 04:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,937
arborvitae is frequently used and can be trimmed as needed. As Mark suggested a local nursery would help identify which plants would work best. However, a live hedge to mark a property line can have problems. Do you plant it on the line or 6' to your side so you can have access and maintain all the way around. If space on the property is not an issue, use a hedge. If 6" would be a problem, plant a fence, they grow very slowly.

Bud
 
  #9  
Old 03-30-16, 01:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 129
Thanks . Space should not be a problem -- it is road side (corner plot) .

For the side with neighbor, it should still be not a problem -- it is a 0.5 acre plot with plenty of land
 
  #10  
Old 03-30-16, 02:08 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,562
Arborvitae was the first plant to come to mind for me as well but Mark's suggestion of checking with local nurseries is a good one.
 
  #11  
Old 03-30-16, 02:55 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
Remember, a "living" fence will be much harder to maintain than anything else. I had privet alongside my driveway and that crap took almost constant pruning to keep it from overtaking the driveway. I cut it way back one year and within 18 months it was back overgrowing the driveway. I finally paid a gardener to cut it all the way to the ground, he didn't want to, said it would likely kill it but I insisted. Well, it was fine for several years but is now growing back, albeit not yet over the driveway. I did cut the roots and all in one area and so far that isn't growing back but the neighbor's English Ivy (Oh, how I detest that stuff) is making serious inroads.

And don't for a minute think that a PVC fence is the answer. PVC gets rather brittle in cold weather and it also has a tendency to acquire black marks from thin air as well as green marks from any vegetation. Using a string trimmer to keep grass and weeds in check can severely damage the PVC.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'