What kind of trees are these in my yard?

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  #1  
Old 07-31-16, 09:47 PM
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What kind of trees are these in my yard?

I'm pretty sure the tall one is a spruce, but not sure what kind of Spruce.
The other one someone said is "Mountain Ash"?
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  #2  
Old 07-31-16, 10:00 PM
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Yes, looks like a blue spruce and a mountain ash. Both of which look like they have had a hard life.
 
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Old 08-01-16, 02:29 PM
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lol, what do you mean by that? Is there a way to make them look better? I'm new to trees and stuff.

Thanks
 
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Old 08-02-16, 03:43 AM
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Hi Brian.
I'm not a pro on trees but happen to have a blue spruce in front and the multiple main trunks is probably from a spruce bud worm attack. They kill the top of the tree causing it to launch multiple branches upwards to take over the top function. Makes for a nice full tree but still at risk for future attacks. The university forestry dept of one of the state departments should be able to advise if there is anything you can do to protect it.

As for the ash, there is the emerald ash borer moving into the state but not sure if your variety is subject to their damage. I've had sever smaller trees that I believe were ash simply die over the winter. I will be contacting someone to see if there is any hope for the others. These are outside my lawn area so not terribly important, just don't like infestations.

Bud
 
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Old 08-02-16, 11:50 AM
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Another non-pro here, but a long time property owner who likes trees, so will give you my 2 cents worth. First off, any trees of this size actually belong in more open space because they could do a lot of damage if they were to fall without professional intervention. But having them in tighter quarters than conventional wisdom dictates is not unique by any stretch, so enough said about that. Regarding the ash, yes, I would have done some thinning on that, but starting a long time ago, so doubt that I would try to change much at this point in its' life. If the ash borers are in your region as Bud said, I doubt they will pass you by. We had three nice ash trees, one close to the size of yours and two a bit smaller, and, after about 3-5 years of watching most of the ash around us die, I thought that ours had miraculously survived. Nope. One spring the two smaller ones did not leaf, and the following spring the larger one did not leaf. They went from looking unscathed to gone. From what I have seen, by the time there are any visible signs the trees are dead, and it would be imperative in your case, given the size and proximity to structures, that you have it removed ASAP, because it does not take long for limbs to start dropping at that point. Meanwhile, again, assuming that you are not concerned with it, enjoy it. As for the pine, yes, possibly, and just as likely, a worm attack as Bud mentioned. Or it could have had something dropped on or dragged across it in its' younger years, causing the main trunk to die and be replaced by multiple shoots. It might not have the cultured or whatever look of a properly trimmed and maintained tree, but I otherwise do not see anything unattractive about it. The big thing that I have seen with pines though, and I do not know how one would determine which this has, they root deep or they root shallow and out. Either way, it seems that it is not terribly uncommon for the mass of the tree to surpass the ability of the root structure to support it, resulting in them falling over in a wind storm, roots and all. So, as I said, I like trees, and have generally been reluctant to remove them without cause, but I also see homes, garages, decks, fences, and maybe a power line in your pictures, all potential casualties of an ill timed fall, so you may have enough cause even at this point in time.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 02:29 PM
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Thanks! I like trees to, but do not know that much about them. Do you think at some point the pines will have to be removed? I think they're both over 40 feet or better. I also have one in the front yard that dwarfs the tiny house of 1000 sf.
 
  #7  
Old 08-02-16, 02:39 PM
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Mountain ash are not affected by the emerald ash borer.

A local arborist would have the best suggestions if you are considering trimming or removing the trees. Personally, I'm not a big fan of conifers being so close to a house... for one thing they usually adversely affect the lawn.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 02:51 PM
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thanks. Is that a Mountain Ash tree?
 
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Old 08-02-16, 02:58 PM
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Yes. See post #2...................
 
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Old 08-02-16, 03:23 PM
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Another quick question and I think later I should post some more pictures of the 2 spruces, especially the one in the front yard that dwarfs the house.

If branches are completely dead, should you cut them off? Even if they would make the tree look really bare on one side?

For example, if you stand under the tree most of the branches are dead for about 2 feet up I'd say.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 03:28 PM
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Well, leaving them on isn't going to bring them back to life. So yes, dead branches should always be pruned. If it is just a few lower ones, you will likely want to prune everything at that sane height to make it symetrical. An arborist will have the best suggestions.
 
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Old 08-02-16, 04:18 PM
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Great, Thank you XSleeper!
 
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Old 08-14-16, 11:02 AM
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How much do you think it would cost to remove the spruce tree? Should it be removed? There's a similar one dwardfing the house in the front that's all dead on one side where the neighbours tree shades it.

Thanks
 
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