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Replacing storm damaged Willow trees once removed

Replacing storm damaged Willow trees once removed

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  #1  
Old 02-15-17, 07:44 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2006
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Posts: 370
Replacing storm damaged Willow trees once removed

As I mentioned in my earlier post, I've contracted a tree removal service to remove the bigger willow tree close to the smaller one that fell on its own...
However, we loved the shade of the Willow trees and I would like to replace with trees that are in the 20-30 ft. height range and have a good leaf canopy - broad with good shade and with a stronger root structure.
I've had good luck with Red Twig dogwood, Rose of Sharon and Red Bud when used for soil and water retention when used on steep banks but they are mostly shrub-like in size and height and don't fit the bill for replacing the willow trees.
There are some ornamentals such as Japanese Maple, Ornamental Crabapple that might work - but I've been thinking about the Hybrid American/Chinese Chestnut, which would grow reasonably faster than other hardwoods and would be more like the single-trunk shape of the American Chestnut rather than the shorter Chinese Chestnut. Should mention I've had good luck propagating Chinese Chestnuts that were already on the property from nut/seed; so the soil should work well for the hybrid tree and I know the root structure performs well for soil retention.
Of course any other recommendations appreciated as I don't have a lot of experience with different trees. Just want a tree with good root system and shade canopy, not greater than 40ft height and with reasonably faster growth than Oak but less than Poplar.
Thanks,
greynold99
 
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  #2  
Old 02-26-17, 08:09 PM
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Location: Oregon
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Whadda got against a Poplar ? Years ago I bought 20 6 foot whips from Zappettini Farms in CA. (209) 928-3468. They grew 3 feet a year and put out a lot of shade. We moved to OR after 7 years or so, and they were over 30 feet tall. These are hybrid poplars. No digging....put a hose nozzle into the ground for a foot or two...and stick in your whip.
 
  #3  
Old 03-02-17, 11:43 AM
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YaddaYadda,
When we moved into our home 20 years ago, there were three Hybrid Poplars in the 40ft - 50 ft height range - Unfortunately they were planted less than 20 ft away from the house and the one on the West end of the home was probably only about 10 ft distant from the outside wall.
We didn't cut them down immediately and at some point I discovered that I could root the cuttings of new growth. I planted several of these rooted cuttings down on the hillside of the house - rather steep and often very wet. Roots around the base of these trees are massive and very good providing soil retention and shade for the South-facing side of house as they're now over 30 ft. tall and still growing.
In order to have the space to plan for a future Sunroom addition, we cut down the poplars that were close and without any additional work, the complete trunk stump and roots decomposed in only about two years. Planted further away from the house they would've been fine but these were just too close, but I like the ones grown from cuttings down over the hill.
greynold99
 
  #4  
Old 03-21-17, 09:51 AM
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Large Willow tree is being removed today and I've decided to go with the Chinese Chestnut to replace them. Turns out the American-Chinese hybrid Chestnut and the Northern Pecan are 40'-60' trees, single trunk but too tall for growing that close to the house. Straight Chinese Chestnut trees I have are 20'-30' often with 3 or more trunk limbs (probably could prune down to a single main trunk when young). Shade canopy is good & broad and while somewhat of a messy tree in the Fall, won't be tall enough to reach our gutters.
Plus their free, I have several 'volunteers' growing where I've composted the nut husks which I'll transplant once the tree service crew gets done with the willow tree cleanup.
greynold99
 
  #5  
Old 03-30-17, 08:53 AM
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Two Chinese Chestnut trees planted where the Willows were and I also transplated a 3ft. Locust over the driveway hill side (30 degree slope easy - you can't hardly stand up on it without sliding) but I like the Locust for deep primary/secondary tap roots. I'll also be transplanting/replacing some Red Bud trees on that bank for soil retention. There's a dozen planted there but they're all nearing the end of life (around 40 years old). It was funny, when we had the concrete slab torn out from the front of the house and hauled all the soil holding the slab for a new elevated deck, where we dumped the soil started popping up with new Red Bud trees... Like it took disrupting the soil to get them to grow - but there were no Red Bud trees growing near the slab or the dirt mound it was on.

I have all my cuttings for Red Twig Dogwood & Hybrid Poplar in water and waiting for them to sprout new growth - but I'm a little late getting new Chestnut & Hazelnut nuts started...
Hoping for some happy squirrels
 
  #6  
Old 04-02-17, 09:55 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Oregon
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For soil retention....how about some hemerocallis/daylilly ? We had some in Northern CA on a steep slope and they seemed to work OK from 1990 to 2006 when we moved.
 
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