homemade miracle gro

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Old 06-12-18, 12:25 PM
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homemade miracle gro

Hi I saw this blog or whatever you wanna call it online. It talks about making homemade "Miracle Grow" solution, which I'd like to try. Here's the link: https://thegardeningcook.com/home-made-miracle-grow/

I'm confused though how it says "Mix all the ingredients together and use once a month on your plants by mixing a 1/8 -1/4 of the concentrate with 4 cups of water in a watering can."

The ingredients are a gallon of water, a tbsp epsom salt, a 1/2 tsp ammonia, and a tsp baking soda. So is that mixture what the instructions are referring to a "the concentrate" I wonder? Seems like with that little of the other ingredients mixed with a whole gallon of water it wouldn't necessarily be very "concentrated?" would it? If so, I guess the instructions are to then further water down this "concentrate" (1/8 to 1/4 cup of it) with yet another 4 cups of water? Does that seem right/correct? Any comments appreciated.
 
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Old 06-12-18, 12:55 PM
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Also, I wonder if it'd be any problem to use lemon scented ammonia since I happen to have that on hand.
 
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Old 06-12-18, 04:34 PM
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I would not try that recipe on plants I like. That recipe may be "a" fertilizer but it's not what I would call Miracle Grow. If you look at Miracle Grow or any other basic fertilizer they provide mainly/solely nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. If you look at what is baking soda, epsom salt and ammonia you'll see that it' missing some of those basic fertilizer ingredients. Epsom salt and baking soda can be very beneficial to plants in some circumstances but they won't replace a fertilizer containing the big three. Then there is ammonia. I don't know how much ammonia household ammonia contains. It might be a expensive way to obtain nitrogen. Then you have to wonder about the other 90% that makes up household ammonia and see if that's good for plants.
 
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Old 06-12-18, 04:49 PM
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Thanks for the reply/comments. There are other sites/blogs I came across (one more of which link as follows) that tout pretty much that same recipe/mixture as a homemade "Miracle Grow" also. Apparently people do use this with apparent success, as a substitute for the store-bought Miracle Grow product. https://gardenlovin.com/4-ingredient...e-grow-recipe/
Any further comment(s) appreciated...
 
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Old 06-13-18, 04:34 AM
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I tried looking up using household ammonia as fertilizer and found many sites discussing the problems. The baking soda and epsom salts are old tried and true fertilizers providing a few of the more major micro nutrients it's the ammonia I don't know about. But that recipe is still unbalanced and only would provide one of the basic three nutrients.
 
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Old 06-13-18, 05:49 AM
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Back in the 1970s, I used to read about, and make up my own garden chemicals which also used some Chewing Tobacco (soaked) to impart poisonous nicotinamide as an insecticide, liquid dish soap as a wetting agent to make the chemicals to adhere to leaves, stems, and roots, and even a can of beer (I forget what it was supposed to do); which seemed to be a total waste of perfectly good beer. I probably haphazardly killed a lot of beneficial insects.

Now I don't have a small enough lawn to experiment with any of these old favorites; I just rely mostly on the worm castings, bird droppings, and my normal rainfall.
 
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Old 06-13-18, 08:25 AM
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If the purpose of this is to save money, I have to say, even a small box of Miracle Gro lasts a really long time.
 
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Old 06-13-18, 09:27 AM
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Gettting away from the big box home centers is the best way to save money. I've found houseplant size packages of fertilizer to be cheaper at Walmart. For the most part to save money I purchase my fertilizer from the local feed & chemical company that supplies the farmers. I can buy 50 pounds for the same price as two pounds of Miracle Grow from Lowes. Granted I get pelletized versus blue sugar crystals so the handling is a little different but I much prefer pellets as Miracle Grow readily absorbs moisture from the air and turns it to sticky mush. I still use baking soda, epsom salts and gypsum as needed for micro nutrients.
 
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Old 06-13-18, 09:30 AM
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Yeah but try finding a place like that in and around a big city like Philly! The gas you use would make up the difference! I don't even have a Walmart near me. So depends where you live if it's a money saver or not.
 
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