Fastest way to kill root?

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  #1  
Old 05-09-19, 11:39 AM
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Fastest way to kill root?

Hey guys, a large tree was cut down a few years ago on the curbside but not at the edge of our house there is a root sprouting up. Whats the fastest and surest way to kill this root please?
 
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Old 05-09-19, 12:36 PM
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I think you need to get a stump killer product. It should have been applied when the tree was cut down. The instructions will say to bore several holes in the stump and pour it down them. I did it to a mulberry tree a few years back and it never sprouted again.
 
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Old 05-09-19, 12:39 PM
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thanks but this will be difficult as it is more like the shape of a small branch and sticking out from under the concrete. So I am thinking only a liquid poured on it is what can be done?
 
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Old 05-09-19, 04:44 PM
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What kind of tree was it (or is it)? Certain trees propagate from root system rather than by seed. Locust trees seem to this very rapidly. I'm continually mowing over upstarts from Golden Locust.
Continue to cut the saplings. You might want to try to follow the stem root to where it's coming from and dig down and chop it out. If the main stump is still there and looks like it's solid, then have it ground out.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 03:49 AM
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The big tree which was cut down from the curb was Maple. As mentioned the rook is coming from under the concrete/driveway so no way to follow it. is there some type of liquid which can be poured on it to kill it at its source?
 
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Old 05-10-19, 04:50 AM
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Now that the tree is long gone there is no easy pour on the ground herbicide that will kill the roots without totally nuking the soil in that area. Whatever sprouts up I would spray with a maximum dose of a brush killing herbicide. I use Crossbow. You may have more shoots appear elsewhere in the future but if you are vigilant you will eventually kill all the roots.

In the future you kill the roots by painting the freshly cut stump with the concentrate syrup of glyphosate (RoundUp). This must be done immediately after the tree hits the ground so the roots can draw in the herbicide.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 04:51 AM
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That's why I'm against any trees used on the curb side of the street. Our town allowed people to plant almost any tree they wanted at curb side. 40 years later and many home owners are now being forced to pay for new side walks that have heaved. Some as must as six to eight inches. And never plant a tree in ones yard where water or sewer line run.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 05:01 AM
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Thanks. We already have Roundup weed killer, would spraying that on the root showing suffice? I am seeing this product but since there is nothing to drill, wondering if it may work by applying to the root?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Spectrac...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

Yes, we had to have the city remove the tree due to both sidewalk and sewer pipe damage.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 05:14 AM
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Weed killer won't do it. A vegetation killer might, but that would kill all surrounding vegetation and leave it barren for weeks. Can you supply us with a picture of the situation? I would try cutting whatever portion you can see and have access to.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 05:41 AM
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ok, will try to get a pic in a little while and will post here.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 07:34 AM
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As you can see, the root is shooting up from under the concrete at the edge of the driveway so I would need to have to turned under the driveway to get at its source. Of course there's no telling where that root is leading to.

https://i.postimg.cc/BnxTfJGX/IMG-0937.jpg
 
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Old 05-10-19, 08:11 AM
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I would do nothing. In that condition it should be "injured" enough to just die off. Maybe you can try to find the other end on the other side of he concrete. Perhaps some of our tree experts might chime in.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 08:40 AM
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The Spectracide stump remover you linked will not work. It only hastens the natural decay of dead material. Your photo shows only the very end of a small piece of root, not a stump.

Roundup (glyphosate) is only absorbed through the green leafy part of a plant. So, you must spray it on leaves for it to have affect. Spraying a trees trunk or roots does not work. The one exception is when a tree is freshly cut or injured you can paint a glyphosate concentrate syrup on the fresh wound and the tree will take it in. An old cut or injury will not work as the tree has already sealed off that area. If you find a large root that is still alive you can drill a hole about 1/2 to 3/4 the way through then fill the hole with glyphosate concentrate. Small roots are usually too small to treat as they are too small to take in enough herbicide to kill the large root mass.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 10:45 AM
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I've killed cottonwoods before cutting by drilling into them with a long auger angled downward (~30), then keeping the hole topped off with diesel fuel for a week or so.

Speaking of the roots lifting sidewalk, I bought some sequoia seeds thinking I would like to see if they would thrive in a zone 4 climate. Then I read that their roots can lift the foundation of a house from 50 yards away. So I decided I'd make bonsai of them instead.
 
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Old 05-10-19, 04:01 PM
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Your bonsai of the Sequoia I would like to see.
 
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Old 05-12-19, 04:17 AM
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@Pilot Dane

Small roots are usually too small to treat as they are too small to take in enough herbicide to kill the large root mass.
So nothing I can do here but leave it alone, correct?
 
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Old 05-12-19, 04:20 AM
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Agreed, unless you see it starting to grow.
 
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Old 05-12-19, 04:24 AM
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Well, it was growing, I had cut off the stalk to the point you are seeing in the pic because I did not want it to get too big.
 
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