Tomato problem


  #1  
Old 07-14-21, 04:58 PM
johnam's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 1,864
Received 12 Upvotes on 11 Posts
Tomato problem

So far Iíve gotten 2 tomatoes like this. Any idea what the cause is? Thanks



Did
 
  #2  
Old 07-14-21, 05:32 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,188
Received 1,701 Upvotes on 1,525 Posts
Pretty gruesome looking! Looks like that weird stem must be the stem->blossom (just didn't grow straight to the bottom) so it's got to be a kind of blossom rot. The deformity could be due to imperfect pollenation which can cause uneven or lopsided growth. I wouldn't worry too much, I just pitch those kind in the garbage so that no mold or mildew affects the others. You'll probably have plenty others. Just hope it's only a few.

Calcium and Epsom salts are things a lot of people just regularly treat their tomatoes with. As with a lot of gardening, it's hard to say what minerals are needed without an actual soil test so people just guess and often think more is better. (Not always true) And by the time you're getting fruit it's often too late to do much about it anyway.
 
  #3  
Old 07-14-21, 05:51 PM
johnam's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 1,864
Received 12 Upvotes on 11 Posts
Thanks..........sounds like a logical explanation. Haven't seen any others on the other plants.
 
  #4  
Old 07-14-21, 07:30 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 25,943
Received 1,759 Upvotes on 1,572 Posts
It's not blossom end rot. My guess is some insect damager earlier in the fruit's development.
 
  #5  
Old 07-14-21, 07:47 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,188
Received 1,701 Upvotes on 1,525 Posts
Clearly not "blossom end rot" but a TYPE of blossom rot, the blossom being involved in the deformity, and is a type of reproductive problem... the problem looks to be along the line along the stem/ovary /pistilate, and the blossom is clearly part of the affected area.

Catfacing is a broad term and it can present with many varied appearances... but it all likely stems from a malformation of the pistilate/blossom or how it developed following pollination of the blossom.

Example: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edi...-deformity.htm

Every deformity like this likely appears a bit different. What is commonly called "blossom end rot" is blackening and rotting at the bottom of an otherwise normal looking tomato. This is clearly not rot, but is a deformation.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: