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Old 10-22-01, 05:04 AM
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The plan is to produce inexpensive fertilizer for a new garden. I'm looking to get some general purpose mix. I will plant an array of fruit bearing tree's, a grapvine, and rose bud's, possibly some wisteria.

Can anyone help me compile a mix that can be used for the entire task? Can I use the soil that's already on the ground? Is there any way to test this soil my self? Also what nutrients (N-P-K) all the different organincs may contain. My neighbor has an apple tree w/ lots of decomposed apples lying on the ground, so i can begin with that.
 
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Old 10-23-01, 03:28 PM
Gami
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Hi Quark,

I'm not much of an authority on soil, BUT it's been my experience that planting in new soil is rich in nutrients, since nothing has been depleting the soil. However, it's still best to get a soil analysis. Prices vary depending on where you are but they normally run $10 to $20. I'm not aware of any home test kits.

Inexpensive nutrients for your soil can come from your kitchen scaps, leaves, your neighbors leaves and apples, etc. You don't need a container or fence to hold your compost. Mine is piled out back. It knits together and doesn't blow away.

Gami
 
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Old 10-24-01, 06:17 AM
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Great. So are there any literatures on how to plant fruit bearing trees in fresh soil? So I'll have a reference as to ground prep, when to add nutrients, and things such as that.

 
  #4  
Old 10-24-01, 05:40 PM
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Quark,
No great need to amend the soil for fruit trees. It is best to go ahead and plant them in the existing native soil. A hole filled with humus, etc. retains too much water and can rot the roots. The important things to remember are: plant tree the same depth as ball or pot(since most trees are grafted), water liberally the first couple months, an occasional food spike won't hurt.
fred
 
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Old 10-29-01, 02:09 AM
Gami
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Hi Quark,

Here's a website that explains how to take soil samples -

http://www.wpconline.org/greenthumb/

Gami
 
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Old 10-29-01, 03:23 AM
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Trees and shrubs have low nutrient requirements. Rarely does the soil need to be ammended.

See

http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplo...es/hort/#Fruit

for numerous pubs on fruit tree care.


Gami: What's NEW soil?? I thought all soil was thousands of years old!

[Edited by Sled Fetcher on 10-29-01 at 06:38]
 
  #7  
Old 10-29-01, 03:28 AM
Gami
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Hi Sled,

You know what I meant! You're supposed to read between the lines. Bad choice of words. I'll have to watch that since you're back!

Gami
 
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Old 10-29-01, 03:44 AM
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Gami:

Back?!? I never left.

Your words are fine. I thought maybe you found a way to clone dirt!
 
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