trimming evergreens

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  #1  
Old 03-31-02, 08:49 AM
warthog
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trimming evergreens

i have two evergreens that have grown at different rates. I'd like to trim the larger one to match the smaller one, and I have no idea how to go about it. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 
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Old 03-31-02, 05:04 PM
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Hello warthog

It depends on what they are and if they are the same variety of plant. Different evergreen plants are pruned differently... If you could tell us anything you know about them even if you don't know their names (ie: colour, needles/scales?, size of the plants, shape, fruit, etc.), it would be a help...

Howie
 
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Old 04-01-02, 07:55 AM
warthog
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trimming evergreens

Thank you Howie. I feel foolish as I do not know the name of these trees. They are the same kind and I would not describe the greenery as "needles". The are cone shaped.......one has grown to a height of at least 10 ft.......the other is about 6 ft. They get little round green "pods" that turn brown and open. I apologize for my lack of knowledge. If I go to the nursery soon I will find the correct name and post it. Thanks again.
 
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Old 04-01-02, 05:03 PM
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Hi again warthog

Nothing to feel foolish about

These forums are here so everyone can ask questions and get answers - a lot better than assuming you know everything and making all sorts of mistakes!

Your description still doesn't ring any bells for me - where are you? Also, are the trees cone shaped, or were you describing the foliage... Maybe it's a plant that doesn't grow in my zone (6b)...

Anybody out there have any ideas from what's been given so far?

I don't think I'd try pruning back until you have an identification - some evergreen trees don't respond as well to cutting back leaders as others and you may end up doing something you really didn't want to.

If you have a way of taking a digital photo, you could post it on Sierra (there's a thread titled 'Sierra' on this Gardening board - easier to direct you there than try to explain it - you can try this link

http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...threadid=84833

Check out Sierra if you can post a pic - there are a lot of good people over there that frequent this community, also and everyone will try to help once we know what we are talking about.. (Actually, come on over and check out Sierra even if you can't take a pic to post - you'll enjoy the company and good conversation!!!)

Failing that, be sure to post when you find out from the nursery

We'll be waiting

Howie
 
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Old 04-02-02, 07:14 PM
ct. arborist
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maybe arborvitae??
cone shaped trees with uh not needles uh not leaves kinda somewhere in the middle. i've been working with plants for almost 20 years and still don't know what you call the foliage of an arborvitae or chamaecyperus, but any way if you take a little of the foliage of an arborvitae an grind it up in your fingers it will give off a rather pleasant cedar like fragrance,give it a try and write back..
ron r.
 
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Old 04-02-02, 11:55 PM
warthog
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trimming evergreens

Hello again. A trip to a local nursery gives me a bit more information. I have some sort of a juniper. There were a few varieties there, not quite sure what mine are. The one that is growing nicely shaped.....the tree itself is kind of cone shaped. I live in San Antonio, Texas. Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 04-03-02, 05:40 AM
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Hi again warthog

Junipers would fit your description beautifully! ....and I think the fruit or those bluish-green 'pods' (of certain cultivars of Junipers) are used as a spice and might be an ingredient in gin...

Most junipers will take a light to moderate pruning, but you have to be careful with the larger ones - sometimes if you trim back too severely without careful consideration of the cut first, you can end up with a hole in the plant - the foliage might grow back, but it will be quite slow.

Ron might have some suggestions on specifics of how to do some major pruning and still maintain the fullness; I usually make cuts under branchlets to try to hide the fresh cut and limit my pruning to wood under 1/2" or so. Also seen junipers clipped to maintain a form or shape - not my cup-o-tea, but they will work for that.

Ron - I usually refer to the foliage of chamaecyparis, cedar, etc as scales...

Hope Ron or others have some good news about pruning

Howie
 
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Old 04-08-02, 05:51 PM
ct. arborist
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sorry i havn't replied sooner,now that spring has sprung it's back to 12 hour days 7 days a week.....
i agree with howie junipers can be pruned rather hard but (assuming that) you are somewhat of a beginner i would recomend instead of one heavy pruning (which you may regret in the long run) maybe 3 consecutive light prunings. maybe a light pruning now, another light pruning maybe at the end of june and one more in early september. this approach may take a bit longer but it will help avoid any disfiguring mistakes that may happen if you try to reduce this juniper all in one shot. but don't be over intimidated either,junipers are good tough plants and usually rejuvinate well after a good pruning.
good luck,
ct. arborist ron r.
 
  #9  
Old 04-09-02, 04:20 AM
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Pruning junipers

Junipers are great plants for the landscape as they are hardy and drought tolerant. According to the Dept. of Agriculture, junipers do not respond well to heavy pruning due to lack of new growth on old wood. Knowing the growth habits of your particular juniper is important if you plan on pruning. Junipers can be tip pruned and thinned but do not cut back to large limbs. Even though two plants are planted side by side, growing conditions can vary due to different soil, lighting, and moisture conditions. This is the way Mother Nature is. The variations in our landscape is what gives it visual interest.
 
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