Sunflower, 'Evening Sun'

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  #1  
Old 04-26-02, 07:15 AM
northgardengal
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Sunflower, 'Evening Sun'

Hi everybody,

Does anyone know if the Evening Sun Sunflower is branching or single stemmed? I did some research to decide which sunflowers I wanted to plant, and among other varieties, I chose Evening Sun. The package says "single stemmed", but my research indicated they are of the branching variety.

It's really no big deal, either way, and they're spaced well enough apart that no matter what their growth pattern, there's plenty of room for them - I am just curious.

Any tips on care would be great too. This is another of my "firsts"!


North Garden Gal
 
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  #2  
Old 04-27-02, 04:46 PM
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Helianthus annuus "Evening Sun"

Depending upon the cultivar, helianthus annuus can be branching or nonbranching. An internet search revealed mostly sites that stated that Evening Sun was branching, although I found some that said it was nonbranching. One site described it as a tall, bushy annual growing to 7 feet. All sites confirmed it was a tall-growing plant best at the back of the beds as a back drop. As with all sunflowers, the heads turn toward the sun. This is suppose to be a consideration when planting. You don't want all the heads turned and looking over your neighbor's fence, as you want to enjoy the large blossoms that have all the colors of the setting sun.

Soil requirements are moderately fertile, but humus rich, moist and well-drained. Sunflowers prefer long hot summers to flower well. Most are drought tolerant. Tall species may require support. Full sun is preferred.

Cultivars may not come true from seed, and hybridize freely. Downy mildew, powdery mildew, canker, rust, and fungal leaf spots are common among sunflowers. Caterpillars, cutworms, beetles, and weevils may attack plants.

Sunflowers are an American species, cultivated by Native Americans as far back as 3000 B.C. The seeds were ground into flour for making mush and bread. Seeds were eaten as snacks and pressed for oil for making bread and soap. They boiled hulls for a coffee like drink.

Spanish explorers in the 1500s took seeds back with them and distributed them along the trade routes. The Russians took the seeds and breeded the "Mammoth Russian." In the 1800s Mennonites settled in Canada with the Mammoth Russian seeds. Seeds began to appear in seed catalogs. Farmers grew sunflowers for silage for livestock. During WWII sunflower oil became an important commodity.

Today gardeners grow sunflowers for snacks, the birds, and cut flowers. Today there are over 150 species and subspecies of sunflowers, each of which offers equisite beauty in the landscape.
 
  #3  
Old 04-27-02, 05:07 PM
Gami
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Hi Patricia,

Please believe me, I'm not trying to be a smart a**, so I hope this comes out the way I intend it to. When copying info from a website, it's best to give the site that you quote from. You could be infringing on copyright laws. At least that's what I was told when I quoted without adding the website on another board. I was sent personal, rude emails from someone who would not identify themself, and I was not able to reply to them. Since I was VERY new to this whole computer thing, I was pretty scared and thought I was going to get sued, and a lot of other things according to what was in those emails. Nothing ever came of it, and we never found out who it was. The moderator was sent the same emails. I wouldn't want anyone else to go through that. There are some NUTS out there, ya' know!

Another reason I'd like to mention it is because you give great info and sometimes I'd like to save the links for future reference.

....another reason is that under another post on caladiums, you stated that elephant ear or giant caladiums' center shoot should be cut out. I searched off and on for days to find a website that said to do that because one of mine has developed a long, center shoot with lots of others coming up all around. So far, my second one hasn't. If I'm supposed to cut it off, I'd like to do that, but since I couldn't find any source validating that , I'm a little hesitatant. Do you have that website?

I hope I haven't offended you. I was going to send this in an email, but you don't have it listed.

Gami
 
  #4  
Old 04-27-02, 05:24 PM
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Sunflower

Sorry, Gami, I will do better about siting sources. Go to http://www.northcoastaljournal.com/1...rden.1025.html for history of sunflower. I am usually in such a hurry jumping about the forums. I do however try to send folks to websites for additional info but have been remiss on the gardening forum. Some of those website addresses are so long it is ridiculous and time consuming to try to type them. Sometimes when you do and try to click to see if it will link from your post, it won't. Then, you have to go back and delete the link. Click the link in this paragraph and you will see that it will not go there.

My general references are The American Horticultural Society A-Z Encyclopedia (Brickell & Zuk, Eds., Dorling Kindersley Ltd., 1996) as well as my well-worn Ortho books and another old friend, The Illustrated Home Garden Guide (Seymour, Ed., J. J. Little & Ives, NY, 1961).

I will get back with you on the Elephant Ear.
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 04-28-02 at 08:20 AM.
  #5  
Old 04-27-02, 05:43 PM
Gami
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Thanks Patricia,

I would appreciate that.

...and I know how time consuming it is to give links, believe me.

I'll have to see if the library has those books. Thanks for the references.

Gami
 
  #6  
Old 04-27-02, 06:49 PM
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Gardening reference books

You will probably find that big A-Z Encylopedia at the library and some of the Ortho books. Those are usually available at home centers or online at www.amazon.com where they want to sell you a zillion gardening books. The Ortho books are very basic but very helpful. The old book from 1961 was given to me by a retired gardener and I doubt if it can be found.
 
  #7  
Old 04-28-02, 04:39 AM
Gami
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Hi Patricia,

I just noticed that the link you gave on the sunflowers doesn't have the http:// in front of it. Whenever I give a link, I always copy and paste it. I wouldn't want to type it in either. Sometimes links can be copied directly from Google. If I'm searching for something and look at several different links, I usually remember which link was the best and copy the URL from Google without pulling the site back up again. BUT sometimes, the http:// isn't in front of all of them, so you have to keep an eye out for that.

Maybe it works without that, but I always make sure it's there.

Gami
 
  #8  
Old 04-28-02, 08:22 AM
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http://

Gami, I went back and inserted http:// and still no go. I hate to sound like the dummy I am, but how do you cut and paste from an internet site to the forum?
 
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Old 04-28-02, 11:47 AM
Gami
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Hi Patricia,

I don't consider anybody a dummy when it comes to computers. I have LOTS of questions STILL. Someday I'll search around for a forum on computer help.

The URL should be right above the website you are in. The way it works for me (in AOL)--I just click in the URL address box and the address is highlighted. Then I copy and paste it into my post. You may have to highlight the address and then copy it. It's a heck of a lot easier than typing all those periods, slashes and other THINGS they put in their addresses. Man, I'd never give a link if I had to manually type it--especially those two liners.

I've made it easy on myself. I bought a mouse that not only has the wheel and two clickers on the top, but each side can be clicked. One side is programmed to copy and the other is set to paste. Beats doing a File/Copy, File/Paste or using the control key. You can also program the top clickers, but the normal is fine for me.

Gami
 
  #10  
Old 04-28-02, 02:57 PM
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Hey ladies
This sounds like its becoming a technical support thread Good thing I'm snooping around

Eric
 
  #11  
Old 04-28-02, 06:13 PM
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Cut & paste

Thanks, Gami!
 
  #12  
Old 04-29-02, 08:36 AM
northgardengal
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Hi you guys!

Looks like this thread is a "branching" and not a "single stemmed" variety . I saw all the posts and got so excited that my sunflower thread was a real "hottie", and you guys are all over the charts - LOL!

Seriously, Twelvepole, thank you so much for your input. It sounds like my placement of the sunflowers will be ideal, branching or not not Guess I'll have to wait to see how they "decide" to develop. And thanks for the link - I don't think I've seen that one yet.

I sure hope I won't be introducing more pests to the veg. garden - " Caterpillars, cutworms, beetles, and weevils may attack plants." Any thought on that? I did read the sunflower is a good companion for corn, so I've placed some strategically nearby. I certainly hope that wasn't a mistake.

Thanks again!

Liz
 
  #13  
Old 04-29-02, 08:46 AM
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Hey cowgirl!

Two years when I put in my sunflowers, I had quite a bit of problems with cutworms. They seemed to go through every seedling. Can't tell you if they were there beforehand, but they aint anymore There is a very good granular insecticide called Diazanon (sp?) I used it last year and the cutworm, tomato hornworm, and Colorado potato beetle problem disappeared Any good nursery should carry this, but I know for a fact Home Depot does

"The Kid"

PS Gots get a camera girlfriend Ive got more pictures to make you even more envious
 
  #14  
Old 04-29-02, 11:38 AM
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Cut worms

My mom always stuck a kitchen match next to stems of tomatoes and seedlings she thought the cut worms would strangle!
 
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Old 04-29-02, 11:55 AM
northgardengal
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Hey "Kid",

Where in the world ya been? No, never mind, I already know the answer to that question - out on photo shoots!

Thanks for the tip on Diazanon. I sure would love to not use that stuff, but I think I will if I have to.

Some of my peppers took a nose-dive right in my kitchen window. At first I thought my cat was chewing on them (as he was caught earlier chomping on the garlic chives!). However it appears that the temps dropped enough to shock them overnight. The slightly more mature ones I got from K-Mart had no trouble dealing with the temperature change, however.

That little bit of cilantro coming up in the herb garden (that I didn't put there) is doing so well! It's probably tripled in size in the last week!

We got to witness two tremendous storms blow right on past us yesterday. As you all may have heard a few serious storms did a lot of damage in Maryland and Virginia - I hope our friend Fred in SW Virginia fared okay through it all.

Bye for now.

"Cowgirl" Liz
 
  #16  
Old 04-29-02, 12:28 PM
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Hey,
Awesome news about the cilantro You are getting the hang of this. Keep it watered.

I know you had told me at one point you wanted to maintain an organic garden, but I dont know of any organic repellents for cutworms, but I'm sure someone does.

The window where you have the peppers isnt drafty, is it?? That may be attributing to the aforementioned nose dive...

Bought a patio tomato plant today at the nursery. Last year, I had promised my grandmother (she's 93) that I would bring her over a tomato plant. Well, for some strange reason, it never made it to Providence, but stayed in my yard... Since I have to go up there anyway tonight, I bought her a plant and will be bringing it to her..

Now that I'm done being generous, I think it's time for me to buy some plants for myself

See ya cowpoke!
 
  #17  
Old 04-29-02, 01:03 PM
Gami
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Hi Liz,

You can use several things to combat cutworms. You need something called a cutworm collar. Lately, I've been using strips of newspaper. We ALL have that laying around. Tear it in strips and wrap it around the sunflower, tomoato plants, etc. Make sure you have some in the ground and an inch or two above ground. It will compost eventually. Once the stems are large enough, the cutworm can't wrap around it.

Sounds like your garden is in full swing.

Gami
 
  #18  
Old 04-30-02, 08:34 AM
northgardengal
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Gami,

Thanks for the newpaper tip. Yes, we have been stockpiling some just for the garden, although it's main purpose was for weed barrier. But I'll be more than happy to "dress up" my sunflowers with little collars

I sure am having fun with the vegetable gardening! Things aren't in full swing yet, but they will be. It's already a wonderful place to sit down and relax. The herb garden is adjacent to the veg. garden with just the slightest hint of shade from the red maple, and I call that spot "my office". I take my journal out there and jot down entries, make my plant markers and drink coffee. How about that for Heaven!

Thanks again for the suggestion. I don't know where I got the idea sunflowers would be pest free! Wishful thinking from the novice gardener, I guess.


Liz
 
  #19  
Old 05-01-02, 03:34 AM
Gami
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Hi Liz,

That's a good idea to have an "office" in your garden. I have an old weathered bench I keep in my herb garden. I'll have to sit there and write. Maybe I'd keep up with a journal. Glad to hear you have started one. They're wonderful to have. I've always intended to start one on the computer and make a plot and list where all the plants are.

Gami
 
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