transplant problem

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-17-02, 04:49 PM
growmore
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
transplant problem

had to transplant plants due to over fertilization, read label wrong, (duh)..transplanted flowers into new soil and had some roots break when removing them from old soil, some are wilting now, can I do anything or will they just come back on their own?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-17-02, 05:50 PM
Gami
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi Growmore,

Sorry, but now it's a waiting game. Hopefully, you haven't damaged them. You can't replace the roots, but depending on what kind of plants they are, you could remove some of the top growth to compensate for the root loss.

What plants? Keep them watered also.

Gami
 
  #3  
Old 06-18-02, 01:19 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,716
Gami is correct. You need to cut back some of the top growth as the current root system won't support it. Keep it well watered until it responds.

Newt
 
  #4  
Old 06-18-02, 01:40 PM
Trying2Help's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 715
How about applying some B-1 or Super Thrive? Would this help the plants "heal" themselves?
 
  #5  
Old 06-18-02, 01:45 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,716
They would help if they ONLY stimulate root growth.

Newt
 
  #6  
Old 06-18-02, 02:30 PM
Gami
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
It's not a good idea to fertilize ANY plants under stress for any reason. Fertilizers encourage new growth, and it's not healthy enough to do that and try and get well at the same time.

As Newt says, fertilizers that only encourage root growth are a good thing. There's one called just that--root stimulator and seaweed fertilizer is also a good one. There are some others. I like to use a root stimulator when I initially plant flowers in the ground or pots. Since seaweed fertilizer is organic, I use that.

Gami
 
  #7  
Old 06-18-02, 02:41 PM
Trying2Help's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 715
I'm not the gardener, my wife is. I just know she uses B-1 which is a vitamin (not ferterizer) and a product called Super-Thrive (from Wally World), when ever she transplants.
 
  #8  
Old 06-18-02, 07:57 PM
growmore
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thumbs up overfertilization problem

Today most have recoverd, I got some info from a gardening store, it was suggested that I try some coffee,( caffine,apartly the helper) and liquid seaweed folier feed as she said that since they were overfertized they would not be able to draw food from their roots. Seemed to revive them almost immediately, and the ones that were really wilted recovered later. Have some leave damage, but my flowers are now fine. Thanks for all the help everyone: Will see if I can help others with what I have learned.
 
  #9  
Old 06-18-02, 10:03 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,716
Thanks for letting us know. Glad to see things are working out for you!

Newt
 
  #10  
Old 07-02-02, 03:24 PM
medoit
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
COFFEE

I agree that coffee is good for a lot of plants (even used coffee grounds). And used coffee filters are great for linning the bottom of your pots to keep the dirt from going out the holes. But be very careful with the coffee, it is high in ACID. Some plants thrive in high acid soil, but others do not.
 
  #11  
Old 07-03-02, 08:10 AM
Gami
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi Medoit,

I tried the coffee filters this year for liners in pots. I've already had to transplant several into bigger pots, and the filter has already dissolved. I think the fiberglass screening is the BEST. I've used the same screening for several years and leave it in the bottom of the pot when I store them.

Gami
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'