Rose bush question

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-20-02, 01:35 PM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
Rose bush question

Hi all,

My wife received a rose bush from somebody as a gift. It came packaged as if it were bought from a store. The package gave directions as to how to plant it so I threw it in the yard where it would get the best sunlight in the morning.

Now I'm sifting through the net and hearing about providing protection from direct sunlight for cuttings.

Now I don't think this is a cutting, but it certainly has been cut. It kind of sprouted a little leaf before I planted it but it shriveled before I planted it.

I wish I had kept the package that gave the details of this rose bush. It said something about prize winning and the picture of the flowers looked great (said they were very fragrant).

Are rose bushes from the store generally cuttings? If not, how do they ensure the color of the flowers? From the thickness of the stems that have been cut it looks as though it has grown for a while somewhere.

I just want 'er to live! I'm not expecting beautiful flowers this year (since the 2 other rose bushes are already blooming in the yard). I just want it to make it until next year.

The other 2 rose bushes were there, by the way, and they are really hardy. I've never had to actually care for them besides hacking off overgrowth. One is said to be over 50 years old. Itís nice looking but the flowers donít smell.

The other bush has an interesting little story. I've lived here for 10 years and I've never noticed it. It's growing right up the side of a rather young tree (probably about 10-15 years old). It has delicious smelling little pink flowers and now I'm addicted. Is there any realistic way of transplanting a well established rose bush from right next to a tree? It has stems that are about 9 feet in the air! I've been hacking it for years with the weed whacker not even knowing what it was (Looked thorny so it went byby). Last year I must have spared a few stems because this year it's quite tall. (Poor thing!) I could just bathe in the fragrance! (I feel like Ferdinand the cow!)
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-20-02, 09:54 PM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi, I doubt very much if your rose bush is a cutting now. It probably started out that way before you got it. Your plant has more that likely been grafted. They start a bush with a certain bush then graft on from another bush. The graft is where the blooms come from. If you cut back your bush past the graft then you will get a different bloom all together, usually a old fashioned wild rose, I think they are neat but you don't want that if you are expecting something else. When you plant your rose, do not plant it below the graft. Roses like full sun or partial shade, the more sun the better. Give them a good rose fertilizer, lightly (about half strength) when you first plant it, then full strength in about 2 weeks or so, then fertilize about once a month until fall then start again in early spring. Miracle grow makes a good fertilizer for roses.
Hope this helps some. If I can help more just holler.
 
  #3  
Old 06-21-02, 10:51 AM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
Thanks for the advice!

I'm thinking about your grafting suggestion. If my bush is grafted would it come with one "stem" growing out of it?

This has about 4 or 5 and some of them have split. They have been chopped off already and came to me with a teeny little branch sprouting off of one of the big stems. It came in a biodegradable pot that was planted along with the bush. I punched several holes in the pot before burying it.


I'll try the fertilizer trick. I want big huge flowers!

How would the supplier be able to guarantee the look of the flowers? Is the only way to graft? Even inbreeding wouldnít seem to result in the same flower.

Would it be a better idea to make a cutting from the rose bush that I'd like to transplant? It's been there so long and it's right along side a tree. I imagine the bush and the treeís roots have intermingled.

I've heard that making a cutting and growing it will make the plant not as hearty. Is there a way to do it well? I really would like to have a rose bush JUST like the one growing right up the small tree in our yard.... but only not right next to the tree (which supplies lots of shade and makes the roses kind of small).

I'd lke to have my entire yard covered in them (well probably not that many, it would make for rather uncomfortable mowing).

Thanks a million!
 
  #4  
Old 06-21-02, 07:26 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Propagating roses

Tips from the American Rose Society:

http://www.ars.org/experts/propagation.html

Rose care:

http://www.rosecare.com/
 
  #5  
Old 06-21-02, 09:44 PM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Usually one stem but sometimes more. It depends on the type of grafting that has been done. Cut off the dead and splin branches, taking care not to go below the graft.

Make sure the pot is below the soil surface or the pot will act like a wick and speed up the evaporation of the water. I usually split the pot or remove it and break it up then put it in the ground to help keep in the moisture, the roots need room to grow.

To get huge flowers try debudding a few buds to force growth to the remaining blooms.

Grafting is the truest way to get thr flowers you want. Get a book on grafting from the library or surf the web. I imagine the american rose society has good information. Grafting is fun. You can do lots of different grafts on one bush as long as you keep to the same species. One bush can have 6 or 8 (more or less) different colors on it.

You can take cuttings from your rose, preferably young ones and
plant them, keeping them moist. Take several, also try transplanting your bush. Be careful and get as much of the root as possible, Plant in a nice big hole and fertilize lightly, water well and keep moist.

I have not had problems with cuttings that I have taken ; not being hearty. I have a tropicana that is a lot nicer and healthier than the mother plant ever was.

Experiment with your cuttings, put some in the ground and some in pots with peat moss and soil, bury them fairly deep and keep moist. Keep watered and keep from freezing in the winter. It will take a few months or longer to root. They may look like they are gying but be patient. Also use a rooting horomone. I use roottone.

Good Luck and keep me posted.
 
  #6  
Old 06-23-02, 07:53 AM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
Thank you so much.

I went out and bought some miracle grow for roses.

I've fed all 3 rose bushes per the instructions on the package.

I plucked so many roses off of the fragrant climber that the rest are really picking up on size. (**sigh** at about 9 feet in the air)

(perhaps because of the feeding yesterday? Can it really have that much of an effect in one day?_

I'll study up on cuttings.... It would be cool to have a bunch of these growing.
 
  #7  
Old 06-23-02, 12:20 PM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi again, Boy you must really want the bigger blooms. As for me the more the merrier. I have to many things growing to be that dedicated. Ha. I went to Jackson and Perkins yesterday and bought me a climbing red rose. I am like you, roses are great, especially the climbers. There are climber roses that have naturally the bigger blooms. You just have to look to find them.

I don't think that one day will really make the difference. Maybe by plucking so many, you are just seeing things bigger. Ha.

Where are you located? Being you like gardening so well, well anyway, roses. You should look into your local Master Gardener classes. You would learn a lot and have lots of fun doing it. And if it is like ours, the people like to exchange plants, seeds and cuttings.
 
  #8  
Old 06-23-02, 12:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Master Gardener Classes

When I lived in Virginia Beach years ago, I was introduced to an unfamiliar growing zone. I contacted the Dept. of Agriculture for info and was told about the gardening classes. It was a wonderful way to learn about gardening in your growing zone.
 
  #9  
Old 06-24-02, 10:08 AM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
I live in southern Michigan. I think I like the gardening classes idea.

One other problem. My huge red rose bush has thousands of little pesky aphids eating away on the new growth.

I saw a couple of ladybugs munching away on the aphids (very fascinating process, BTW), but there needs to be MANY more ladybugs to help this poor bush.

It doesn't seem to be hurting the bush any as a whole, but it can't be helping it any.

How do I get rid of these pests? Buy ladybugs? Are pesticides a good idea?

My red rose bush thanks you (as do I).

I'm not really going for the bigger blooms, I just like to have several in my house (they smell so good). I decided to quit robbing it because there's only so many on there!
 
  #10  
Old 06-24-02, 02:35 PM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Rose really attract aphids. The safest way to get rid of them is to go out with a hose and wash themoff. The one trouble with that is that overhead water on the leaves attract black spot. With black spot you need to remove all the leaves and destroy them or take them to your dump, never compost black spot.

Yes lady bugs are a great way to get rid of the aphids, but to keep your lady bugs there you need to buy the eggs or larvae and not the bug itself as it will try to go back to where it was hatched.

An insecticidal soap kills the bug primarily by damaging their cuticle. The soap must contact the pest directly to kill them. It is effective only while still wet and there are no residual activity after it dries. Need to repeat sprays often when you see more . It may kill predatory insect larvae that are feeding on pests when soap is applied. Otherwise it is safe for most beneficials.

As with any chemical, READ the instructions FIRST.
 
  #11  
Old 06-24-02, 05:18 PM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
Fascinating about the ladybugs! How do they know where they hatched from?

Do they actually sell the eggs or larvae?

Thanks for the advice!

And does black spot look like a black spot? lol I don't want to kill my poor rose bush. It's been there for decades without my help.


(I've heard around 50 years actually)
 
  #12  
Old 06-24-02, 05:32 PM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Yes, black spot is black spots on the leaves of roses. It is common with moist summers and watering over head. (sprinklers) If by chance your rose gets it, sprinkle with sulphur dust or spray.

One of the most asked questions about ladybugs in the master gardeners plant clinic the year I joined was; when I buy ladybugs they all disappear, why. And you know the answer. I do not know why, kind a like salmon I quess. Homeing instinct. Anyway good luck with your roses.
 
  #13  
Old 06-29-02, 06:25 AM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
HAH!

I had a bunch of threads opened in different windows like I usually do.

I came across this one and it just sounded soooo familliar! I kept reading that first post in amazment as it sounded just like my situation!


Then I saw that it WAS my post. DUH!
 
  #14  
Old 06-29-02, 07:45 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Talking Black spot

Not recognizing your own post at DoItYourself.com is a sure symptom that you have become hooked on the site! LOL.


For a picture of black spot on roses:

http://www.usna.usda.gov/blackspot.html
 
  #15  
Old 06-29-02, 04:11 PM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
Thanks for the link.

I've used a spray for both bugs and disease, but it doesn't seem to be effecting the furry stuff growing on it.

I think it's mildew, but I've never seen furry mildew. Could it be molding?

The poor neglected thing. Now that I'm trying to save it it's probably going to croak on me.

Since I've gotten rid of the aphids I'm noticing some more good new growth.

Tough ol' girl!
 
  #16  
Old 06-29-02, 04:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
  #17  
Old 06-29-02, 04:51 PM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
Yep! That looks like it!


Would it hurt to remove the diseased parts now? Some stems have it all up and down it. (Poor thing!)

The buds are starting to croak now (the whole bush of them). I think it's about done with it's blooming. When is it best to prune? Should I wait for next spring?

When would be the best time to make a cutting?

Thanks!!!!!
 
  #18  
Old 06-29-02, 05:30 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,834
Powdery mildew

"Plants develop irregular patches of white fungus on new leaves and buds. It causes leaves to drop, buds to droop and is most prevalent during hot weather. Remove all leaf litter below the plants and keep clean. Try not to wet the foliage as this spreads the fungal disease. Water in the morning so foliage dries quickly. Dust or spray with a fungicide every seven to ten days."

"There are three times a year that roses are pruned. Each pruning has a specific purpose and is important to good rose bush development. The most important and severe pruning occurs in early spring. First remove all dead, then remove the canes that are growing into the centre of the plant. It is important to let air into the centre of the bush. Shrub roses and climbers do not need to be severely pruned as they bloom on last years growth. Just remove any dead or diseased canes, and shape.

Summer pruning is used to enhance flowers and flower production. To produce florist quality blooms, remove or dis-bud any secondary flower buds that may form just below the main flower. Once blooms begin to fade it is time for another form of summer pruning. Flowers are produced on secondary canes of roses. By removing spent blooms or flowers at the point of the first outward facing 5 leaflet leaf you will encourage the formation of these secondary canes.

Late fall pruning consists of tidying up the bush for the onslaught of winter. Once the cold has set in late November and all the leaves are dead on the bush, prune the rose to 24". By doing so, the plant will be able to withstand any wind or ice damage that may occur over the winter." Roses. Retrieved 29 June 2002. http://www.susansgardenpatch.com/roses.htm

I would not try to making a cutting for progation from a sickly rose. Wait until it is in good health. Right now it is contagious! Make sure you keep your pruners disinfected with bleach, as you can spread the disease.

For more info about powdery mildew on ornamental plants:

http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3047.html
 
  #19  
Old 06-29-02, 08:22 PM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Here in Oregon the wetness in the air is bad for many plants that easily get powery mildew. I have to use a sulpher dust or a systemic for disease control to keep it under control. You really need to use these in the dormant stage also to do any good. As I have stressed before Please read all instructions and use when the wind is low or gone. I have black spot on my roses pretty bad right now, we had some wet weather a week back and it did not take it long to get my roses.
 
  #20  
Old 06-29-02, 09:12 PM
Gami
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi RennaBelle,

I just wanted to say WELCOME and thanks for your expertise on roses.

Gami
 
  #21  
Old 06-30-02, 01:01 AM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you, but i am no expert. I am just passing on what I have learned through trial and error and also classes through Master Gardeners. If I have been of any help I am grateful. I like to share things that might be of help to anyone.

Again, thank you for the warm welcome.
 
  #22  
Old 06-30-02, 08:08 PM
Gami
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi RennaBelle,

You're welcome! That's how we all learn. Some day, I hope to take the Master Garderner's course.

Keep your good advice a'comin'!

Gami
 
  #23  
Old 07-01-02, 02:05 PM
Jason R's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 261
Thanks to all twelvepeople! lol

Great information.

In all honesty, though, I'm little impressed with my big sickly old bush (Boy that phrase in any other forum probably would raise a few eyebrows). The flowers are clustered, really small, and completely odorless. I'd be happy to get it healthy and smaller (it's so huge). Guess I'll wait for fall before I get out the cutters for that one.

The one I really want to make cuttings off of is the climber that I just found this year. I've lived here 10 years and never realized what it was! (I finally left enough stems alone last year to actually allow for a small bloom this year). It smells soooo good.

I'll search around on the net some more for cutting information. I've seen some good stuff out there, but thought I'd just be lazy by asking all of you about when is a good time. I assume it's best right when it's starting the new growth in spring?
 
  #24  
Old 07-01-02, 09:36 PM
RennaBelle
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Propagating roses can be done at any time of the year but it is best done with the newest wood in the spring. Do not take cuttings of the oldest wood as it would take to long to root. Dip in a rooting compound and place in a soil that will stay moist for long periods of time but not soggy.

Hybrid Tea, Grandiflora ,and Floribunda roses require an annual pruning in the spring after winter protection is removed. Prune when the Forsythia blooms.

Ramblers have clusters of smaller flowers and produce best on last years growth. Prune immediately after blooming.

Large flowering climbers have blooms more than 2 inches across and bloom on 2 year old wood. Prune these in autumn.

Always dip cutters in alcohol or a mixture of one part bleach to 9 parts water to sanitize your tools and keep diseases from spreading.

For powdery mildew you need to improve air circulation, control weeds, remove plant debris and use a registered fungicide.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'