Use of Sevin Dust

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-27-02, 11:47 AM
northgardengal
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Use of Sevin Dust

Hi Everyone!

Wow it's been a long time since I posted here and not because I don't need your help! The weeds and pests in the veggie patch keep me occupied most of the time. I also have the luxury of IM'ing with fellow-member Bomber, who continues to help me tremendously! Take a bow, Bomber

I resisted using chemicals of any kind as long as I could stand it, but now, with the garden shaping up much better than I ever dreamed, I find myself reaching for the heavy artillary to defend my "kids". Companion planting has no doubt provided a lot of support for everything, but not quite enough, so it seems....

The first problem was with the cabbages being attacked by cabbage worms, so I very carefully applied a very small amount of Sevin 5% to each plant in the evening and after I watered. Seeing the benefit almost immediately, I have found myself tempted to treat other veggies - chard with millions of holes, sunflowers with lots of leaves chewed and I lost a whole crop of sugar snap peas to something which may or may not have been a pest, but something as simple as not enough water. Don't know. It looks like ants may be involved - there are billions of them everywhere.

The package indicates the product will serve to help eliminate all sorts of insects.

Finally, I will get to the point: Is there anything I shouldn't use Sevin on? Is there something safer that Sevin, but as effective?

As always, thanks for your guidance.

Liz
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-27-02, 12:33 PM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Hi Liz,

Although it is tempting, I use as little sevin as possible. This year only for flea beetles riddling my eggplant leaves. So the eggplant harvest is a long was off, and the sevin will be gone. Last year I started using it for in-ground yellow jackets. I used to be a pyromaniac but now I just sprinkle sevin in/around the hole. In a couple days they are gone. Oh, ants aren't usually a destroyer of crops.

The perfect organic powder for the cole crops is Bt, you should be able to find it in powder form as Dipel. Lowes/HD may not have it so check your hardware stores that have garden supplies.

fred
(1 inch rain yesterday, and 1/2 in just completed)
 
  #3  
Old 06-28-02, 11:16 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,716
The problem with using Sevin and other pesticides that are broad spectrum (kill just about all bugs) is just that. It kills all bugs and that includes the good guys. Usually, there are less predators than bad bugs so that there are enough for the predators to eat. It's all a balancing act. If you kill off the fewer good bugs, in a few years you will become more and more dependent on the chemicals.

Why not use floating row covers to keep the bugs of your veggies?

Also, Bt is a biological control that is safe and effective. Fred gave you some good advice on that.

Newt
 
  #4  
Old 06-30-02, 08:44 PM
Gami
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi All,

Speaking of good and bad bugs, something was biting me, and normally your first reaction is to swat without looking! Right? For some reason, I decided to look and see what it was. It was one of those green lace wings? What are they called??? No, I didn't swat it. Has anybody else been bitten by one?

Gami
 
  #5  
Old 06-30-02, 08:48 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,716
Yes Gami, I had one take a bite on me last year and I too was very surprised. I didn't know they bit humans. I didn't swat it either as I had seen it land on me and watched while it nibbled. Talk about surprised!

Newt
 
  #6  
Old 07-01-02, 04:30 AM
howiek's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Acton, Ontario, Canada - Zone 6b
Posts: 413
Probably attracted to you 'cause you're both so sweet...

H.
 
  #7  
Old 07-01-02, 05:57 AM
Gami
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Oh, Howie, you're so sweet to say that.

Gami
 
  #8  
Old 07-01-02, 07:41 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,716
Aw shucks Howie, you make me blush!

Newt
 
  #9  
Old 07-02-02, 10:01 AM
northgardengal
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Okay all you "sweet" people, break it up...

Fred and Newt - excellent information. I have read loads of stuff on the use of Bt, and I don't know why I didn't just go that route to begin with except that my local veggie gardening friends promoted good ol' Sevin. With friends like THAT who needs enemies!

Good thing I used very very little of the stuff until I checked the responses to this thread.

So ants aren't such a big deal? Cool! Ants do go after aphids, correct? And that would be a good thing...

And this in from Drought Central: less than 1/2" of rain fell on Thursday evening, for a total of about 3/4" for North Garden, VA during the month of June. Big tanks of water are being brought in for the cattle here on the farm. And our spring fed well ran dry two weeks ago! Unbelievable!


Liz
 
  #10  
Old 07-11-02, 05:19 PM
marturo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,448
As good as Sevin

Hi northgardengal,

Yes indeed there is something as good as Sevin. It is called Bonide Brand, Rotenone Pyrethrin spray. I just ordered a Qt from http://www.ridabug.com out of Wickliffe OH, for $29.99 + S&H PH# 440-943-1125

It is a Big Gun with fast knock Down and a 24 Hour wait to eat I would say wait 48 hours to be safe before eating. It is made from a South American Tree sap, and the Pyrethum Daisy.

I use it with a spredder sticker if the crop will not be eaten before two weeks. Without the sticker if food is harvested sooner, this is very important.

Flea Beetles, Potatoe, Cuckumber, Squash, Beetlse & Larve, it is as deadly as sevin except it stops being toxic unless protected by a sticker in 24 hours.

The last few years I have wrapped the first 10 inches if my cucurbits with Tinfoil and complete sucess over the dreaded Squash Vine Borer. I did put a paste of Dipel on the stem before applying the tin foil just in case.

I have also used the Rotenone Pyrethrin spray on my fruit trees. Allways spray very late in the afternoon & Evening as most of the good preator bugs have retired to the outskirts of your garden by that time of day.

Next Morning the bugs that eat your plants are killed inside of two hours & the Pretators don't like to eat dead bugs.

I hope this is what you are looking for I have been making & using this insectside before it was even made available to the public. 1972 to present day.

WARNING: This like Sevin will harm Childern & Pets if eaten. It has a shelf life of 1 year, so use it up by buying only what you need in a season.

Marturo
 
  #11  
Old 07-14-02, 06:18 PM
ByronB
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Sevin is the second deadliest pesticide in the home garden,

rotenone 5% is the deadliest. Sevin LD 50 of 850, Rotenone5%
LD 50 of 162. (Outlawed in serveral states).

Both kill honey bees for several days after application.
Honey bees are on the endagered species list.

Next time you sit down to dinner, fill your plate, then remove about 3/4ths the food on your plate, This is what you will have without honey bees.

Many farms in CA have stopped growing melons, cukes and squash because there are not enough bees to pollinate their crops. Fruit growers are also having the same problem

Also read the label on Sevin, It does not kill all insects, as a matter of fact, spider mites love it,

It can not be used on all veggies. Read the label real close, If the veggie is not listed odds are Sevin will burn the plant.


Byron

Please no Sevin, Save the most valuable beneficial insect in the garden..
 
  #12  
Old 07-14-02, 09:02 PM
marturo's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,448
Use 1% not 5%

ByronB makes some good points.

I'm sorry I should have pointed out that Rotenone comes in two potencies 1% & 5%. I only use the 1% & only when it is absolutly the only thing that will work.

Only use these big guns in the late evening after the Bees have gone to hive for the evening. Thank you ByronB, I'm not sure if all of us know how bad things are for the Honey Bee today.

ByronB if you have some time. Would you please bring us up to speed on where we are in the fight to save our Native & imported Honey Bees today.

Marturo
 
  #13  
Old 07-15-02, 07:39 AM
northgardengal
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi Byron and Marturo,

I feel sick about not looking into the use of Sevin more closely BEFORE using it! However, rest assured that not only did I NOT use much of it, I did use it in the evening only! And you can take this to the bank - I will not use it anymore! You guys have made some very important points.

We have, thank goodness, loads and loads of honey bees everywhere on the farm. Byron, I hope you will have the time to educate us on the honey bee's status. I was ignorant to most of what you mentioned in your post.

Liz
 
  #14  
Old 07-15-02, 02:40 PM
fewalt's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sw VA
Posts: 3,100
Hi Liz,

I'll add a little bit of what I know about honey bees.

You're fortunate you have a bunch of them around. I used to have three or four wild hives(in trees) in the woods several years ago. Then they all just disappeared over one wniter. I learned that there was a mite which killed off many wild and domestic bees. This was about six or seven years ago. And I can count on one hand how many honeybees I've seen around the house in the past five years. I see a few in other places, but my area(county) was hit pretty hard. Of course, another reason is less bee keepers around.

fred
 
  #15  
Old 07-16-02, 08:56 AM
northgardengal
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi Fred,

That's very tragic about the bee population in your area. Since we have the apple orchard right next to us, that would explain why we have so many. However, the people who now manage this huge orchard do a bunch of spraying and I'm pretty sure they have only been doing this for a short time - therefore, we may see a decline here before too long. I sure hope not, though.

Liz
 
  #16  
Old 03-17-09, 02:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1
sevin and bees

Please be careful using sevin dust in the garden. It is a broad spectrum pesticide which includes killing bees. If you use it, do so only on nonflowering plants. If you want anything pollinated in your garden, don't kill the pollinators. Use on cabbage is fine, (though bt is a better option) but use on anything that is a continuous flowerer should be avoided. The bees return it to their hive and poof they're all gone. This is one of the possible causes being studied in the bee die out last year.
 
  #17  
Old 03-17-09, 06:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 948
bacillus thuringiensis (aka worm whipper) as sold by our vendor. it's a bacteria that attacks a limited species and all i've used on tomato plants for the last five years. no more sevin on them. and for the record, "sevin" is banned and no longer available. the replacement active ingrediant is carbaryl
and allthough not the old school "sevin" may be lethal to the bees as well.
 
  #18  
Old 04-19-09, 07:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: So Ill 62821
Posts: 2
Angry roaches

Will seven dust kill roaches in the house ? Especially in the kitchen area. I have a terrible roach problem. Need Help Please !
 
  #19  
Old 04-19-09, 08:55 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 1,716
Hi Johnniee,

This post already explains the toxic dangers of Sevin. I DO NOT recommend it's use indoors or outdoors. I answered your question here with a site for you to id which roaches you have and what environmentally friendly products you can use.
http://forum.doityourself.com/indoor...ml#post1556181

Newt
 
  #20  
Old 04-20-09, 06:57 AM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,959
One of the most effective roach products is boric acid powder.I can tell you anecdotally that I sell loads of it and have many customers who have had good results from it.

Boric acid powder is sold under a variety of brand names around the country.The key is looking at the percentage of it in the ingredients labeling.The better products are as much as 99% product.

"Roach Prufe" is a well known name,they have a website with info,but you can find it under other brand names at the same strength.Again check the label as there are also lesser strength brands.
 
  #21  
Old 06-07-10, 04:35 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 1
Sevin, bees & beasties

Hello,
I'm new to your forum but have found it helpful to read the thread on Sevin Dust. For years it was out there as a popular and "safe pesticide" (that's an oxymoron anyhow!)
I did not know it had been removed from usage as a pet flea dust so am really glad to hear that it has only a one year shelf life. I have a "self-created" pet rescue and currently house over 20 cats. I recently dusted the barn enclosure area where the cats reside with Sevin and then began reading about the hazards of it. Thank goodness the package was old and I hope I have done no harm to my cats!
I also have lots of wild flowers and flowering plants with plenty of bees around and do not want to harm that vital community. Since I have nearly 50 acres of woodlands, pastures and meadows, does anyone know how I might go about setting up housing/hives to foster the bee population? I have noticed a decline, but did not know why? Also how do you tell a honey bee from other bee types like the nasty killer bees?
Beer 4U2
Thanks.
doctorboo
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'