Hot Surface Ignitor


  #1  
Old 12-21-02, 02:14 PM
Doktrred
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Is there a way to......

Is there a way to test a glo bar igniter while not connected to the oven?
I recently replaced one in my older Tappan oven, after reading several posts here. The oven now lights!
As I was taking the old one out of the oven I noticed that one of the ceramic wire nuts was gone. I am wondering if the old igniter might still be good (maybe a bad wire connection),and I should keep it in case this new one goes bad at some point?
Can you use an Ohm meter or something to test to see if one of these is still good?????
Mike
 
  #2  
Old 12-21-02, 07:35 PM
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Hello Mike. Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic & our Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

There are very few methods used to test glow ignitors. I personally do not rely on testing. Most, if any at all, appliance dealers don't even bother to test these items.

Replacement new ignitors are installed to resolve ignition problems due to ignitors which do not glow or do so incorrectly.

Glow ignitors operate on the principle of electrical resistance and absorption of available current. The values of used ignitors change with time and age.

A glow ignition ignitor will absorb all but 5 volts of available current. At that point it must be hot enough to provide a positive source of ignition to the gas. It's ohm rating is of little value when cold.

Since you already have the new ignitor installed and it's working properly, there is no reason to keep the old one. However, if you elect to save it, no harm done. It may or may not be of any value.

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  #3  
Old 12-26-02, 05:52 PM
Doktrred
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Thanks for the reply,
I was afraid you'd say that.
Well that new glo ignitor I installed worked well for a few days, but now I have a dead oven again!
I know you can't tell from where you are what the problem is, but do you have any suggestions on what I could do to see why the new ignighter worked for only a few days?? Something else I could check? I hate to keep buying $60 ignighters, if they are going to last less than a week.
Initally, the old ignighter was glowing -but no gas. After I replaced the ignighter with a new one, it worked. Now when I turn on the thermostat, there is no glo from the new ignighter and obviously no gas as well. I checked the breaker, the rest of the unit has power, I rechecked the connections to the new ignighter and they seem fine.
It is a 1980 Tappan combo range/ oven/ microwave( model and ser. # 76-4887-23/ 08169-20250983). Maybe it's time for a new appliance?????????????????? I would rather NOT spend $400-700 for an new oven and 'wave if I could get this one to work.
Thanks again.....
Mike
 
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Old 12-26-02, 09:00 PM
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Hello: Mike

If you have a voltage tester {volt ohm meter} you could test for current at the quick disconnect leads. Remove the ignitor, insert the volt meters test leads and verify if current is at the wires whit the temperature turned up. Do the test but be careful. The current will be full houseline current.

With the current turned off, you can test for continuity at the thermostat terminals. Possible the internal contact switch is burned out. If there is no continuity the thermostat is most likely the problem.

Be sure the ovens optional selection controls, if it has any, are set to manual. If there are selection switches, test them also. With power still turned off, test for continuity at the gas valve.

You could also test for current at the gas valve. May not be getting current to the gas valve. Some ovens have fuses. May be the fuse is burned out. Test for continuity across the fuse.

If the fuse is defective, it may appear to look fine. Check it with the tester for continuity. Check across the fuse holder. Check the wires. Your testing and checking for a place where electrical current cannot pass to or through a part or wire, etc.

You may need to visit a local appliance parts store for futher infomation. This text only format makes it difficult to explain all the methods and procedures.

Appliances with the combo range, oven & microwave units further complicates matters. Good Luck and use caution working with household current on.

BTW: It is not all that uncommon to have brand new ignitors fail in such a short period of time. Especially non OEM brands.

Happy Holidays.
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