water in the gas line


  #1  
Old 02-25-03, 02:46 PM
kdplus5
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Question water in the gas line

I have intermittant gas coming out of my gas line. I suspect there to be water in the line. Is it safe to adapt a wet/dry vac to the line and try to suck out the water? What other suggestions do you have?

KAD
 
  #2  
Old 02-25-03, 07:55 PM
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Hello: Kad

Water in the gas line? Getting water out of the line is easy. The question to be asked is how did the water get into the line? Knowing that will help to insure it does not happen again.

Myself or anyone, as professionals on this web site, to advise how to remove the water without asking and knowing how water entered the line in the first place, would not be providing real professional advice.

Water in gas lines is serious. Water always enters existing piping because there is some type of damage to underground piping. Removing the water and not replacing and or repairing the line will simply allow gas to escape until the line refills.

Once the determination can be made on how the water was able to enter the line can the problem be totally and safely solved.

Kindly use the reply button to post the conditions under which the water entered the lines, which lines exactly, the location of the line or lines and the appliance or appliances served by the line or lines.

Web Site Host & Gas Appliances Forum Moderator. Tom_Bart......TCB4U2B2B Company Enterprises.
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  #3  
Old 02-26-03, 06:13 AM
kdplus5
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Thank you for your prompt reply. The gas line is only being used for a gas dryer in the garage (detached from the house) The gas in the house is not interrupted and this line has only recently acted up due to excess rain. My house was built in 1936 and we purchased it 4 years ago. This problem happened one other time about two years ago. I used compressed air to blow into the gas line and it fixed the gas flow problem. I am only speculating that there is water in the line. The symptoms are that the gas does not flow constantly to the dryer which causes the flame to go out in the middle of the cycle and then have the odor of gas remain after the cycle is complete. I assume the water is causing the gas to bubble through and not flow constantly. Let me know how I can know for sure and any other possible tests I can try. Thank you.

KAD
 
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Old 02-26-03, 06:16 PM
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Hello: Kad

As I suspected. An underground gasline with water in it. Blowing it out with compressed air is the proper procedure but in cases like this. Water in the line indicates the pipe is rusted out, damaged or in some fashion leaking.

Since water is heavier than the gas and the gas pressure is low, water will enter the pipe at any place where there is damage, rust or excessive age deterioration.

The only premanente and safe solution is to replace the entire line. This must be done to resolve the problem or the problem will continue to worsen and also become more dangerous.

If your intending to replace the line yourself, use the best quality materials and proper installation methods. Be sure to follow and meet all local codes applying to underground gas lines.

If you have any doubts about doing this project properly and safely, consulate professional help.

I am not a plumber and do not claim to be. I have dealt with issues, conditions like this and many far worse and more complex. Jobs such as these can quickly become dangerous if not done correctly or properly.
 
 

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