gas meter question


  #1  
Old 07-12-03, 09:19 AM
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Disconnecting gas monitor heater

I need to disconnect my LP monitor to repair some wall damage behind it. On the outside of my condo is the meter and what I assume to be a regulator. Ther are 2 shutoff valves, one on a vertical pipe that comes out of the ground, and one above the meter that is after the regulator. Can I just turn one of these valves off or should I contact the gas company to do it? Also when I hook it back up do I need to bleed the air out of the line or will it do it on it's own. I contacted the company that makes the heater (Rinnai) and there were no help on the bleeding question, said I should contact the gas co, you'd think they would know if I had to bleed one of there products or not.
Thanks for any insight.
 
  #2  
Old 07-12-03, 06:51 PM
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Hello Dave. Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic.

I can invision your intensions but not the specifically the gas meter assembly. I do not have experiences with propane gas meters.

Advising the gas utility is always the best method. If the meter set assembly serves only your house you can close the valve on the pipe rising up out of the ground.

Honest truth is I do not know what that other valve is or what it is for, therefore can't say. Turn off the valve on the vertical pipe.

Be aware that that pipe must be iron or steel. It may or may not be depending on what is used with LP and legal in your area, state and or country. Of which I would not be aware of.

No web site is going to mention anything about bleeding a gas line even if the line where outside. Too many legal issues of responsibilities, etc.

What I can advise you to do is bleed only a small amount out of any new piping installed. Be absolutely positive there is no source of ignition anywhere around the area. NONE!

Bleed small amounts and wait 5 minutes if more bleeding is required. Bleed as little as possible and use your sense of smell. Stop often or when the smell is noticed.

Bleeding will be required if the length of pipe is long but not so if short. Bleeding air can take place at and during the initial fire up of the heater too. Takes longer but it can be done for safety.

Also be advised that many gas companies turn off gas for a customer and turn it back on for them during do it yourself installations and or repairs. Ask your supplier.

Also ask about relighting the appliances when they trun it back on, safety checking the new heater etc. Many nat gas companies do far more for their customers than customers realize. I do not know what LP suppliers do but it does not hurt to ask.

That is all the info I can offer you based on what I know about LP gas meter and equipment. Help it helps.

Regards & Good Luck.
Doityourself Web Site Host & Gas Appliances Forum Moderator. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.
 
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Old 07-12-03, 06:55 PM
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Thanks for the reply, I think I will contact the gas company and see what they will do or recommend.
 
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Old 07-12-03, 07:42 PM
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Dave

Good idea and a safe method too.

Like natural gas equipment and I have to assume LP as well, the equipment is only rented by the customer not owned by them.

I could be incorrect on LP equipment, since I have no experience in that industry. Nat gas suppliers always own the meter assembly in the USA anyway.

Not sure in other parts of this "Rock" we call "Earth."

Calling to inquire and ask plenty of questions is a good method for anyone whom is about to work on any gas related equipment or gas piping, etc.

Calling the local building & safety departments within your area is also a good idea to insure all the work to be done and or appliances to be installed or replaced etc meets all the new codes and rules too. Many codes & rules have changed over time.
 
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Old 07-13-03, 06:01 AM
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We do own the heater. The whole thing started this winter. We bought the condo last June. When we started running the heater it was no keeping the temp properly (keeping the room wau too warm) and the temp gauge was reading lower than it was in the room, and thus running more than it should. I took the top cover off and noticed a small about 4x4 inch hole in the wallboard, stuck my hand down and it was cold air down there, then noticed the temp sensor was right in front of the hole. I temporarily reloacated the sensor to the outside of the unit so it would read properly and stuffed a rag in the hole to block the cold air. Now that its warm I want to stuff some insulation in and fix the hole, but I have to move the heater to get to it. As far as the bleeding I think I can have the gas turned off, then run the heater until it goes out, but I'll see what the gas co says.
 
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Old 07-13-03, 07:03 AM
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Dave

Possible misunderstanding. I know you own the heater. It's an appliance like others you might have. You own those. But most likely not the gas equipment that is outside.

That equipment is the gas companies meter to measure the amount of gas used and their regulator to control both the gas pressure delivered into the house piping and control the flow volume as appliances use it.

All the outdoor stuff <equipment> belongs to the gas company. Reason why I suggest contacting the gas supplier before doing anything to that equipment. Even turning off the gas at that meter <equipment.>

Based on your heater description, I assume the unit hangs or is attached to an outside wall. It's either a vertical unit or a horizontal unit.

Both types are commonly referred to as wall units, wall heaters, etc. The vertical types are more commonly ferred to as wall heaters while the horizontal units are usually referred to as thru the wall direct vented units or any name similar.

If that hole behind the unit is a random hole that appears to be caused by accident, etc and does not draw air from outside or from any source, it most likely can be closed off.

If that hole draws air from any source form inside or outside, below or above, it may be a breathing hole for the unit. Be sure you know exactly what your doing before doing anything.

You might be or maybe blocking off air that is suppose to enter there or nearby. That incomming air may be used for venting or combustion, etc. The sensor may be there but can be relocated.

Modifing any existing setup to heaters can be hazardous and are often the cause of many carbon monoxide posionings each year.

Use caution and always get the adivce and inspection of a licensed pro either before or after any work done on heaters of any type and always before the next usage afterwards.

Sharp Advice
 
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Old 07-13-03, 08:55 AM
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The heater is an internal unit with a vent pipe to the outside, the hole that's there is in the drywall at the baseboard. It is similiar to the units in these phots, but is about 2 years old.
http://www.rinnai.co.nz/005photo.htm
 
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Old 07-13-03, 09:31 AM
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Thumbs up

Dave

Thanks for the photo. Understand it all now.

And yes. I understand that the heater is an inside unit. The vent is outside. All vented heaters and other gas appliances are this way. Vented to the outside. Except for ranges and stoves. Those two appliances use overhead hoods.

In Closing.
Regards & Good Luck.
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