how to bleed


  #1  
Old 11-25-03, 11:39 AM
VAmomof4
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question how to bleed

I'm new to this home and heating system. Had to turn off water for plumbing repair and I 'm sure there is now air in the water line from hot water heater to furnace. Not sure which end to start on to bleed the air from the water line. Can anyone offer some insight???

Thanks--there are cold nights ahead!
 
  #2  
Old 11-25-03, 12:19 PM
Sharp Advice's Avatar
Admin Emeritus
Join Date: Feb 1998
Location: The Shake and Bake State USA
Posts: 9,927
Upvotes: 0
Received 7 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Hello VAmomof4. Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic and our Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

After the plumbing repair was completed, all that should need to be done is open a hot water faucet and allow the water to push out any air in the tank, furnace and lines.

Best place to bleed air out is at a hot water faucet that is farthest away from the water heater. Not sure how this applies to the heating system, since which type of heating system you have is not mentioned.

Much also depends on how extensive the repair was and where that repair was located, etc.

If you need further assistance, use the REPLY button to add any additional information or ask additional questions. Doing so will automatically move your question to the top of the forum list.

Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice. TCB4U2B2B Company Enterprises. Web Site Host, Forums Monitor, Gas Appliances Topic Moderator & Multiple Forums Moderator. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.

Personal Reminder:
Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
"The Life You Save, May Be Your Own."
 
  #3  
Old 11-25-03, 01:02 PM
VAmomof4
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
the plumbing repair was a replacement of leaky shower fixtures-- ended up also replacing soldered copper piping with cpvc--so had to cut off water to house because there was no turn off valve for that room/shower only (dwn MBR). The heating unit is in the attic - an "aqua therm" unit (humidifies heated air, I think) that is connected to our water heaters located in garage. I see from the water heaters and the heating unit 2 pipes covered with black insulation sleeves with turn spigot type valves on each. I would think thre may be a purge valve or something like that near/around/on the heating unit, but I'm unfamiliar.

Thanks!!
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-03, 09:49 AM
Sharp Advice's Avatar
Admin Emeritus
Join Date: Feb 1998
Location: The Shake and Bake State USA
Posts: 9,927
Upvotes: 0
Received 7 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Hello: VAmomof4

If the heating unit/units are aqua therm units/unit, there should not be any need to bleed them/or the unit.

(Some heaters of this type are dual units, meaning there are two of them while others there is only one, thus my usage of unit/units.)

There will be an electric pump that circulates the water from the hot water heater to the heat exchanges in the heater unit/units. Therefore, no bleeding should be required.

Once you have bleed the air out of the hot water lines at a tube faucet and at the sink faucets far away from the hot water tanks as is possible, all should be fine.

If the is a circulating water pump manual turn on switch on or near the heaters pump or heat exchanger, turn it on while bleeding the lines at a faucet.

Turning on the pump only and not attempting to heat the house by using the thermostat, will circulate the water only, without heating (no fan running) and help to bleed out the entire system.

If the heater is a gas fired unit with a warm or hot water humidifier, (if there is a system such as this set up) no bleeding should be required. The unit is self purging as water circulates.

The two valves on the pipes you describe are there to turn off the water flow while the unit is under repairs and or when replacement is required. Valves should be left on for normal use.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: