Propane Gas Supply Line


  #1  
Old 11-30-03, 08:50 PM
Dugald's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 46
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
gas range feed line

while moving the gas range out from the wall, I noticed that the gas feed line, where it enters the stove top area, has a very severe twist and/or bend in it. This seems so severe that I suspect the gas feed is reduced considerably. I am concerned about moving the range any more as I am afraid the line might rupture at that point. I wonder if I could shut down the feed valve, cut the feed line past the bend and rejoin it to the system. Is this too risky? Do I need any special tools to do this, if so , what do I need? Is this an advisable DIY job or should I call a Gas Service Technician
 
  #2  
Old 11-30-03, 09:50 PM
Spudz
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Are you referring to the flexible gas line that looks almost like aluminum or the actual copper gas line coming into the kitchen floor/wall for gas service?
 
  #3  
Old 11-30-03, 10:29 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 11
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
if it is copper, you'll need a flaring tool and copper cutting tool.
if the pipe isn't long enough you'll need a coupling of some sort and a lil more pipe, or just pipe to back to the last valve with.
at any rate, with the tools and part it shouldn't cost more than $40.

and yes, make sure you have the valve cut off.
Another thing, behind stoves I tend to make a large ummm like circle of pipe, so if i ever have to pull out the stove the pipe it doesn't bend.

best of luck, running copper pipe tends to bring out profanity in myself.


ohhh... one last thing to add.
liquid soap/detergent.
make sure you have some, it is very important to pour it over the fittings/connections to see if there are any leaks, much in the way you'd look for a hole in a tire.

drew
 
  #4  
Old 12-01-03, 12:50 PM
Dugald's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 46
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
reply to Drew re: gas range feed line

thanks for your help, it doesn't seem to be such a big job. One more small point, Does this have to be a single or double flare connection ? I won't be able do a double-flare is why I'm asking
 
  #5  
Old 12-01-03, 08:55 PM
Sharp Advice's Avatar
Admin Emeritus
Join Date: Feb 1998
Location: The Shake and Bake State USA
Posts: 9,927
Upvotes: 0
Received 7 Upvotes on 6 Posts
My Professional Two Cents

Hello Dugald and Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic.

The advice thus far is accurate.

But there needs to be reminder notes added.

There is no small point when it comes to dealing with gas, either natural or propane. Leaking gas in a confined area, such as a house or inside any closed structure is no small point.

Cautions need to be taken.

Be sure to soap test every fitting connected to check for leaks. Be patient. After applying the soap. Tiny leaks take time to develope bubbles at the leak location.

Best suggestion is to use Leak Detection Soap. Made especially for gas leak testing and detection. Use a paint brush to apply. Apply per instructions. Be sure to coat the undersides of all fittings & connections too.

DO NOT use pipe tape on connector threads. Use pipe compound. Pipe tape often does not allow the connections to fit tightly together. Especailly when too much is used and or the tape is rapped on the pipe threads in the wrong direction.

My assumption, after reading this thread, is the gas connection is either an aluminum tube or a copper tube and not an approved natural gas stove/range flex connector.

Which it is, is not clearly known. Assumption it is either aluminum or copper since you mentioned flaring. If it is either of the two metal type of tubes, yes, a double flare is highly recommended.

Double flaring tools are also available at appliance parts and hardware stores. If the job is worth doing, it's worth doing it right and doing it safely.

Be aware that in many parts of this country, when natural gas is used as the fuel type, copper is not legal nor meets safety code in many areas. Using an approved natural gas flex connector is.

Retail appliance parts dealers can also help. They will need the make, model and serial numbers.

Appliance parts dealers are an excellent source to obtain approved replacement parts. Dealers are listed in the phone book under appliances.

Be sure the electrical power to the appliance is turned off, before attempting any repairs. Always check for gas leaks when ever a repair includes any connection of a gas part.

Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice. TCB4U2B2B Company Enterprises. Web Site Host, Forums Monitor, Gas Appliances Topic Moderator & Multiple Forums Moderator. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.

Personal Reminder:
Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
"The Life You Save, May Be Your Own."
 

Last edited by Sharp Advice; 12-01-03 at 09:14 PM.
  #6  
Old 12-02-03, 04:24 AM
Dugald's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 46
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
followup re gas feed line

Thanx again for your very detailed & helpful info. I do hope that my last reply to my original post, on this topic, did not imply that I felt that I felt that this was a job that could be done in a sloppy fashion. I agree 100% that any job worth doing is worth doing well. Perhaps a further explanation could clarify my original question.
This is a propane service connected to a 500lb. tank (located about 20 feet from the outside of the house). The main feed line(5/8") runs from the tank to a shutoff valve which is strapped to the baseboard behind the range in the kitchen. Attached to this shutoff valve by means of a reduction fitting is a ten foot coil ( 3/8 " diameter) of what appears to be flexible copper tubing. This , in turn, is connected to the input unit on the range. I have found it necessary several times, during the last several weeks, while renovating the kitchen floor, to stretch the copper coil to its extreme. when attempting to return it to its original coiled shape while pushing the gas range back to its original location in the kitchen, it seems that I have caused the pipe to kink at the point where it begins to enter the stove top area. I do believe that, with the advice, I have received. I will probably be able to do this task correctly in the appropriately safe manner.
As usual, your advice & timely response is most appreciated.
 
  #7  
Old 12-02-03, 04:53 AM
Sharp Advice's Avatar
Admin Emeritus
Join Date: Feb 1998
Location: The Shake and Bake State USA
Posts: 9,927
Upvotes: 0
Received 7 Upvotes on 6 Posts
Thanks Dugald

With the last updated information, myself and all readers of your question should have a much clearer visual understanding of the conditions.

Propane does not have the chemicals natural gas does, making it okay to use copper tubing as the gas supply material. Like natural gas, an odorant is added to make leaks known.

Hardware stores, as well as appliance parts stores, have the correct type of splicing parts needed to connect copper tubing together.

The primary reasons for the double flare is to insure a strong fitting connection, which is desireable when movement of the line is needed, possible and or required and pressure is involved.

The situation you described for the flooring work being done has all of them. Thus, double flaring is a requirement.

If and when you purchase the double flaring tool kit, connection parts, etc, ask about a means or product to coil the tubing. Such is available but I cannot provide a specific product brand.

Regards,
Sharp Advice
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: