gas oven slow to light


  #1  
Old 01-12-04, 12:39 PM
altaltaltalt
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gas oven slow to light

The last few days my gas oven takes up to 15 minutes for the gas to start flowing. Stove top burners are working fine.
 
  #2  
Old 01-12-04, 01:00 PM
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Hello altaltaltalt and Welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and my Gas Appliances topic.

The problem description indicates a weak hot surface glow ignitor. Replacing the ignitor is most likely to correct the problem.

A hot glow coil, working correctly, will glow an intense bright yellow orange in color. Too much orange, any reddish color or a dull orange means the glow coil is weak. Replacing the ignitor should solve the problem.

First unplug the appliance. Loosen or remove the screws securing the glow ignitor. Follow the two wires attached to the ignitor. At the end farthest from the ignitor will be a wire pull apart quick disconnect.

Disconnect the ignitor at that point. Install the new ignitor exactly as you found the existing coil. Replace each part in reverse order. Plug in the appliance and turn it on. The burner now should work.

Be advise that some new replacement ignitors do not come with quick disconnect ends. In this case, it's okay to cut off the quick disconnect from the old ignitor and attach it to the new ignitor.

Simple clip off the wires several inches above the disconnect on the old ignitor, attach to the wires of the new ignitor and wire nut the two ends together.

Repeat the process to attach the other set of wires and wire nut them together. There is no postive nor negative {polarity} to be concerned with.

Glow ignitors are fragile & break easily. Handle and install the new ignitor carefully. Glowing hot surface ignitors are a non returnable and non refundable electric componet.

Be sure to unplug the appliance from the electrical power first.

Retail appliance parts dealers can also help determine what the possible problem may be. Bring the make, model and serial numbers.

Appliance parts stores are an excellent source for original replacement parts. Appliance parts stores sell replacement parts for all appliances. The stores are listed in the phone book.

If you need further assistance, use the reply button. Reading the previously posted questions pertaining to ovens will also provide help and additional information, removal, installation instructions, procedures and methods, etc.

Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice. TCB4U2B2B Business Management Serivces. Web Site Host, Forums Monitor, Gas Appliances Topic Moderator & Multiple Forums Moderator. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.

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  #3  
Old 01-12-04, 04:31 PM
altaltaltalt
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thanks for your response

Thank you for responding. I had read the previously posted problem regarding a gas oven.
I thought it would not apply to me since my problem seems to be decreasing gas flow.
I will certainly try replacing the ignitor.
Thanks again.
 
  #4  
Old 01-12-04, 08:17 PM
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Hi: altaltaltalt

The gas from the gas valve will not flow until the ignitor reaches the preset temperature needed to ignite the gas. The value is based on the electrical resistance value of the ignitor.

As the ignitor ages, it becomes weaker and glows less brightly but still glows. The ignitor has to glow the bright intense yellow color to reach the temperature that is required to ignite the gas.

Changing out the ignitor usually resolves the problem. It is the most likely part to cause the problem, least expensive and easiest part to replace as a first attempt to fix the problem.

In some cases the gas valve will allow smaller amounts of gas to flow, causing smaller flames on the burner. In that case the condition is actually worse and or unsafe than no flames. Hot surface ignitor replacement oftens corrects that condition too.

In some cases replacing the gas valve is also needed. However, replacing the ignitor as the first attempt is the best method and often resolves the problem. Try that first.

Once the ignitor is replaced, post back the results. Most likely you will post a positive reply, be satisfied the problem is corrected and glad you did it yourself.

Doing so also shares the experience and final results with others reading your question and learning more from it.
 
  #5  
Old 01-12-04, 08:32 PM
altaltaltalt
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gas oven slow to light

Sorry to come back again over this but I just want to be sure - if my problem is the ignitor, wouldn't I hear and smell gas coming out?
 
  #6  
Old 01-12-04, 08:58 PM
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Hi alt

The answer is no. The gas valve cannot open and let gas out of it if the hot surface ignitor does not reach the pre set temperature which is based on the electrical current value.

Which is part of the designed in safety system. The glowing ignitor does not emit the gas. It actuates the gas valve, which lets the gas out. The glowing ignitor needs to be replaced.

The ignitor only provides the hot surface source of ignition and opens the gas valve to let the gas out. Do not confuse the two parts. The weak ignitor is the hot source of ignition not where the gas comes out of. That part is the gas valve.

You need to replace the glowing ignitor first. That usually solves the problem. Good Luck.

Sharp Advice
 
 

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