Gas Water Heater


  #1  
Old 02-11-04, 07:25 AM
Richard6180
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Gas Water Heater

My gas water heater is about 10 years old. It's a 40 gal. Rheam. It sounds like water is constantly going into my water heater, but I can't seem to find where the water is coming out so I don't understand why it won't shut off. I can't find a leak anywhere. I have also noticed that my hot water runs out a lot quicker than it used to.

Any suggestions on what the problem might be? My first impulse is to replace the water heater because it probably needs to be done anyway (or at least in the near future). I just don't understand how water can be going in all of the time and not be coming out somewhere.
 
  #2  
Old 02-11-04, 08:22 AM
Richard6180
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I think I found the problem. It looks like the T&P valve is bad. Is this easy to replace?
 
  #3  
Old 02-11-04, 08:43 AM
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Hello: Richard

Not all that difficult to replace a T/P valve. You'll need a large adjustable wrench, turn the valve counter clockwise to remove it.

Install the new valve using thread compound on the threads or any type of oil that is handy. Any type oil is fine. It's used only as a lubricant if thread compound is not available.

Pipe tape can also be used if you already have some. Once around the male end threads wrapped clockwise is enough. To much piles up or binds up the threads. Leaks than occur.

Close off the incoming water supply. Open a sink hot water faucet. Open the flush valve faucet slightly to drain off enough water to below the valve and than stop.

Remove the existing T/P valve, install the new one. Open the inlet water valve and allow the tank to refill and the air to be pushed out through the sinks hot water faucet.

If need be, reinstall the drain line that was installed into the existing T/P valve or install a line if none is there or one is needed or wanted. Great do it yourself project....

Be advise that opening the flush valve may create problems. Some flush valves never stop dripping once opened. Capping the faucet may be required. Replacement is more difficult but possible.

If you need further assistance, use the reply button to add any additional information or questions, etc. Using this method also moves the topic back up to the top of the list automatically.

Regards & Good Luck. Sharp Advice
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  #4  
Old 02-11-04, 11:09 AM
Richard6180
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The old T&P valve is stuck with Pumber's putty. Any good trick to get this darn thing off.
 
  #5  
Old 02-11-04, 01:04 PM
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Hi: Richard

Since I am not a plumber, I do not have the expert answer to provide you.

But I do know how to obtain a professional plumbers advice. Diy has the best plumbing professionals anywhere to be found..

Allow me some time to contact our diy pro plumber and have him post the next reply to help you out. Check back on your question several more times today. Should be a reply asap.

Sharp Advice

BTW:
You ran into the very problem that happens when the incorrect thread compound is used, in my opinion. I always suggest thread compound, pipe tape or any type of oil.

Plumbers putty is not a product I would use nor any plumber I have ever known of. That product is used by "amateurs" per the real plumbing pros I know of...

Now we both will find out what a real plumbing pro has to say about that...
 
  #6  
Old 02-11-04, 03:33 PM
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To free a stuck part or fitting, I find a good pipe wrench and a few Swift hits with a hammer will assist you in this removal of said device.

Use pipe dope on the threads, it might look like putty but it could be just dried out pipe dope your seeing around it.
 
  #7  
Old 02-11-04, 04:05 PM
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Hi: Hi: Richard

The diy professional plumber has provided the answer.

Bigger pipe wrench and a hammer....LOL.... It works.

Brute force works too. Done it myself.

When all else fails...

get a bigger hammer & apply more brute force....

Something we cannot do fixing appliances.
 
  #8  
Old 02-11-04, 04:55 PM
Richard6180
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Thanks guys. I tried the really big hammer and the extra long wrench (for leverage) and it wouldn't budge. I think it will need to be cut off.

I don't have the tools to cut and re-assemble properly so it looks like I am calling a plumber. I will be interested to see what he does. I am going to be really pissed if he opens it easily (like the jar of pickles you struggle with for 10 minutes and then the next person just pops it open).

Thanks again for the assistance.
 
 

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