Propane conversion problem


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Old 08-16-04, 03:29 PM
gokelly1
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Propane conversion problem

I made the conversion to LP gas on a new Kenmore stove, but I think I made a mistake (all parts and instructions were provided). When I turned the gas on a loud screaming noise came from the burner valves. Gas was leaking through all four valves, even right through the stem for the knob. After replacing the valves the same thing happened, so I rechecked the regulator and found I apparently did not switch the plug to the propane position. I did that and tried replacing one of the leaking valves with another new one, but it also leaks. I am afraid I ruined the regulator and it may be letting too much gas pressure through causing the valves to leak. Any thoughts or suggestions before I buy a new regulator? If that is the problem, do the valves need to be replaced again as well, or will they stop leaking with proper pressure?
 
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Old 08-16-04, 04:32 PM
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Hello: gokelly1. Welcome to the Do-It-Yourself Web Site and my Gas Appliances topic.

Best bet, at this stage and my not being absolutely positive what problem the reg may have, best to replace the regulator with a propane regulator.

The existing regulator may be internally damaged from the higher pressure. The appliance may be getting direct propane tank pressure, if existing regulator is damaged.

Chances are the top burner valves became unseated when the gas pressure exceeded normal regulator LP gas pressure. Which would be about 11 inches water colume for LP gas while only 3.5 or 4.0 for natural gas.

Sometimes the valves may leak from higher pressure but will not do so once the correct pressure is set. Other times such is not the case. Happens with nat gas too but not too often. Rare cases.

You'll also need to convert (switch over to LP) the oven thermostat. Unless you already did this and if it needs to be done. Remove the thermostat knob. You'll find a set screw on the T-Stat body marked "N" for natural gas and "L" or "LP" for propane. Turn set screw to LP.

Retail parts dealers and appliances parts stores can help determine what the possible problem may be based upon what happened. Bring the make, model and serial numbers. Dealers and appliances parts stores are listed in the phone book.

Kindly use the reply button to add any additional information or ask additional questions.

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Old 08-17-04, 09:23 AM
gokelly1
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Propane Conversion Problem Followup

Thanks for the quick reply.
Followup question: Does it make sense to borrow a propane regulator from a barbecue hookup first, to see if it helps and if the valves still leak? That way I can avoid the major cost of a new regulator if that's not going to fix it. The oven is electronically controlled and I have not turned it on at all, so I hope nothing is damaged there.
 
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Old 08-17-04, 09:52 AM
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Wink

That small regulator off the BQ would not let the amount of gas in for the stove

so I rechecked the regulator and found I apparently did not switch the plug to the propane position. I did that and tried replacing one of the leaking valves with another new one, but it also leaks. I am afraid I ruined the regulator and it may be letting too much gas pressure through causing the valves to leak. Any thoughts or suggestions before I buy a new regulator? If that is the problem,
"Just out of the box here" Was this regulator on the stove and you just piped the LP line off the tank to it??
On lots of units where we plug off a regulator for LP that locks it out. The line comeing to it has to be on a regulator for the 11" like Ted said for LP. check it all out. Dont forget LP gas will go down in a hole or can and stay there so look out.

ED
 
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Old 08-17-04, 10:07 AM
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Hello: Kelly

Using a bbq regulator will not prove much if anything. The regulator is not orifice sized for the needed volume of gas. Only rated for the btu rating of the bbq. Likely to only supply enough gas to run one top burner only.

Use a new appliance reg for that appliance only. That insures proper gas volume, pressure and flow. After installing that, all other leaks and or other unknown damages to the oven gas valve, top burner valves, oven t-stat, etc will have to be diagnosed.

If the pressure was high enough to unseat top burner valves and cause them to leak, as you described, oven t-stat and oven gas valve likely to be damaged as well. Cannot say for sure.

Personally have seen appliances exposed to 40 plus pounds of nat gas pressures which causes major damages to valves and appliance regs. Not to often seen damages to all metal parts like top burner valves. All regulators, controls, t-stats and gas valves had to be replaced.

If you are unsure of the possible damages and what exactly needs to be done. Failure to get the appliance back into a usable, leak free, safe condition and proper working order can be hazardous.

Have the appliance safety checked after work is completed. Best bet is to contact an appliance service professional.

Good Luck
 
 

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