New home - Broken Kenmore Dryer

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  #1  
Old 10-11-04, 08:42 AM
kchurch79
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New home - Broken Kenmore Dryer

Hi all,

This board is awesome. I just purchased my first home and I am learning quickly to be a handyman.

Anyway, after moving in I found out the dryer doesn't work correctly. (Home inspector missed it on inpsection).

I have a Gas Kenmore Elite Total Care System w/Evenheat Model No. 110.72972102. The problem is that the dryer does not get very hot. Even at the highest setting (High, Cotton, Timed setting) It takes over 2.5 hours to dry a standard load of laundry. I cleaned out all the duct work with lint (there was a bunch) but the performance hasn't improved. Do you guys have any idea what the problem may be? A bad thermastat? Bad solenoids?

Any help is much appreciated!

Keith
 
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Old 10-11-04, 11:22 AM
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Restricted Exhaust Vent (Most Common Cause)

Hello Keith. Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic and the Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

Check the entire venting system. This also includes the exhaust vent hood outside. It has a flapper that may not be opening fully or not at all. Locate any restriction within the entire exhaust system and clean out all lint. Too much lint restricts air flow and greatly increases the drying time.

Dryers do not have a very forceful blowers. Which means the connection point directly at the dryer will likely collect the most amount.

Also check the flapper door inside the vent hood. It must be able to freely open and close. Check for kinks and or sharp bends in the venting tubing, if plastic venting tubing is used.

Read the existing questions on the subject of dryers. Doing so will quickly provide you with answers to questions & provide additional information on how to resolve the problem. Dryer help info: http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=159481
 
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Old 10-11-04, 08:49 PM
kchurch79
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Ekkk

Hi,

I tried to open up my dryer but I couldn't get the back panel off. It seemed like the panel was glued on. Any suggestions? I have a feeling this problem is not from lint. I've vacumned a lot, but of course I can't get the damn thing open.

I am almost willing to concede on doing it myself. Any help out there?

Keith
 
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Old 10-11-04, 09:34 PM
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Hi: Keith

Look around the inside of the door frame. Likely to be two or more screws holding front door panel on. These screws may be installed vertically up above the door frame and not right there in plain view.

May be two screws at the bottom outside of the front panel. Front panel, which contains the door, needs to be removed. Not the back panel(s). If there are two screws a the base outside front panel, remove them. Than lift panel from bottom upwards like an style wooden garage door.

Some dryers require the top lid to be lifted up first. May be clips between top lid and front panel. Once top is lifted up, look for screws holding front panel to side panels. Remove those so front panel can be removed.

Very likely excessive lint inside the fan blower compartment and in the fan blower cage, etc. May also be excessive lint in the vent ducting inside the machine. You should not give up just yet. Try again. It can be done.
 
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Old 10-12-04, 08:55 AM
kchurch79
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Ok, will try again tonight.

I thought I had to get to the back panel to see the glow ignitor and thermostat. Do you think those items could be suspect as well or anything else for that matter? I'm not sure how much more work there will be to take this thing apart and put it back together.

Other than getting all the lint out, do you have any other recommendations?

When I tried to remove the back panel, something must have shifted because the holes where the screws were removed did not line up anymore.

I am usually pretty handy but this is my first time digging into a dryer.
 
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Old 10-12-04, 06:00 PM
kchurch79
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Ok, taking a break

I got the front panel off and viola, all the things I may need to replace are right near the front. Now, I am taking a break. I am going to put the screws back in on the back. Hopefully I didn't screw something up.

Thanks for the help!! It will feel like an accomplishment if I can fix this thing myself. After buying a house, funds are limited and this was just an unpleasant surprise.
 
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Old 10-13-04, 07:33 AM
kchurch79
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Help.

Hi again,

I got the lint out of everything I could. I did a load of laundry and ran them through the dryer. It still took a long time to dry the load of clothes. In fact, I had to put on a damp shirt for work this morning.

I left the front panel off to see the gas burner in action and it seems to work just fine, but the dryer isn't getting hot enough. At least it seems to me that it is not hot enough. 2.5 hours seems excessive for clothes.

Any suggestions?

Keith
 
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Old 10-14-04, 09:14 AM
kchurch79
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Help?

Sharp Advice? Any advice?
 
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Old 10-14-04, 02:26 PM
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Thumbs up Additional Help & Advice

Hi: Keith

This is what I want you to do and do it exactly as requested. It is a test.

Totally remove the exhaust vent from the dryer. No connection to the exhaust discharge vent. Allow dryer to vent into room or area this one time.

Dry a normal sized load of clothing or towels. Note how much time it takes to fully dry the load and advise. Test is to determine if the problem is inside the dryer or within the venting system.

Yes. I am aware you already checked venting system. But I need to be sure that venting system is not the cause before suggestion any other possibilities or repairs that may not need to be done.

That would not positively solve the problem. No use in attempting to fix what is positively not to be the cause of the problem. Must know for sure.

Be accurate with the time to dry. If dry time is 60 minutes or less, venting is cloged or restricted somewhere. If no change in dry time, dryer has a problem which can later be determined, hopefully.

Another area to check is the washer. Yes, the washer. When the load is done the towels or clothes must be damp and not overly wet. If wet or to wet, ring out water type wet, the washer is not spinning out all the water or pumping it all out. Washer has a problem. Which I am not able to offer advice on. Contact a washer repair person for that problem.

Faulty washers cause the problems of dryers which take long dry times. But the acutal problem is not the dryer but the washer. Get the idea here? Hope so. Trying to help in a logical step by sstep amnner to determine an exact cause so the problem can acurately be diagnosed and than fixed.

After the dryer test and washer check, post back the exact findings. No real hurry, I'll be around to reply back. Good Luck.
 
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Old 10-14-04, 08:58 PM
kchurch79
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I Cannot Believe It!!

I ran the SAME load of clothes that was not dry after almost 2.5 hours. It was almost bone dry after 50 minutes and piping hot. This is a large load so I think 50 minutes is normal. I cannot believe it was the venting to the outside. Now, I have to figure out how to clean that thing out. The seller did have a Chinchilla she wanted to get rid of. I wonder if she shoved that thing in there?

So... the exhaust to the outside must run 15-20 feet in the walls and floor of my townhouse. I know it runs vertical because the exhaust exits where the floor of my loft is. Should I buy a big snake to suck the crap out? I'm disappointed in the construction of the exhaust.
 
  #11  
Old 10-19-04, 07:20 PM
kchurch79
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A Bird's Nest

Hi Sharp Advice,

I cleaned out the exhaust duct. There was a bird's nest stuck in there. After it was all cleared out, it filled a Target shopping bag.

I duct taped the duct inside the house with a wet/dry vac hose stuck in it. I put the vac on the blow mode and from outside I poked through the mess with a snake.

I then pulled the mess out with my hand. Well, thanks for the help. I think my dryer problems are resolved.

Keith
 
  #12  
Old 10-20-04, 06:06 AM
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Long Drying Times? Suspect & Service Vent System First.

Hi: Keith.

Yes. I too suspect the dryer problems are totally resolved. Good Job.

Information to all readers whom have dryers which take excessively long times to dry clothing and or towels, etc. Never assume the venting system is entirely cleaned out without a fully complete and physical inspection.

The majority of times why a dryer takes an excessively long period to dry is directly related to some form of restriction in either the venting system or within the machine itself.

Part of the venting system must also include the exhaust vent hood. Inside the vent hood is a free floaty baffle. That flapper door inside the hood must be free moving so it can easily open and close. When the flapper baffle door cannot and does not operate free, a venting restriction occurs which increase the drying times.

Another part of the venting system is inside the machine. Inside is also a small ducting system which exhausts out of the machine and into the external venting system. Restrictions inside the dryer can and do happen.

Check the areas around and inside the fan blower housing. Clean blower fan as needed. If needed and or suspected there is possibly any restriction in the ducting out of the blower fan housing, remove ducting, clean and reinstall to blower housing.

Avoiding assuming there is anything mechanically wrong with any dryer that takes excessive amounts of time to dry, without a full inspection and cleaning of the entire venting systems.

Same applies to suspecting part(s) to be defective or in need of replacement when dryers take long time periods to dry or not dry fully. Parts do cause these types of problems.

So can any form of restricted venting system. Cleaning a venting system first, often avoids costly part(s), uneeded repairs and wasted time. Vent cleaning should be part of the routine maintenance a dryer needs. Best to inspect the venting system every two years and clean or repair as needed.

Local appliance parts stores sell venting system cleaning brushes and tools. They are designed to clean metal ducting systems. Plastic venting should be avoided, if possible and per manufacturers recommendations.

If the venting system is already plastic flex, replace every two years and or replace with metal, if possible and or desired. Not required in most areas to replace. Nor is plastic flex ducting out of code in most areas. Just the easiest to initial install, maintain and easiest to replace when needed.
 
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