Convert Old '60s Tappan gas range to Electronic Ignition?


  #1  
Old 10-12-04, 05:45 PM
Applescruff
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Convert Old '60s Tappan gas range to Electronic Ignition?

I have an old '60s Tappan gas range (which works great, all burners and oven), is it possible/feasible to convert to electronic ignition? I would prefer to spend a few hundred to convert this old dino rather than spend $1,000 on a new gas stove that may not last 5 years. Eventually, my goal is to save for a Viking or something similar.

Thanks for any input
Linda
 
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Old 10-14-04, 04:19 PM
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Hello: Linda

Converting the appliance(s) is possible but not feasible. Rather difficult. Parts not designed to fit and more often than not do not work well when installed into older appliances. Thus this type of conversion is rarely ever done and no specific parts are made for the purpose of conversions.

Anyone aksed in the appliance industry likely to also say no to a conversion or would not do it themselves. Nor are appliance parts dealers likely to sell any parts to do it even when they know what the intended purpose will be for.

For all intensive purposes the idea sounds good but is not available, not done and or conversion parts not available. Standard parts for current models will not fit or work either. Nor are those parts returnable or refundable once purchased. Bad news at every corner & every turn...
 
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Old 10-15-04, 11:35 AM
R
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I have an aquaintance who modified a vintage gas range with modern burners. He spent nearly $1,500. It can be done, but not at savings.
 
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Old 10-18-04, 03:00 PM
Applescruff
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Thanks for the info. My Husband is the one who is not comfortable with the pilot lights! But, the Lady that owned this stove before me didn't turn the gas valve off after use! She had used this stove daily for the last 10 years. I am now reading about electronic ignitors going bad quickly! I think I am going to get happy with my OLD range (by the way it, cooks great, boils a BIG pot of water in under 5 min) and install a gas detector! Is there any such thing as an automatic shut-off when gas is detected?

Thanks again
Linda
 
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Old 10-18-04, 06:33 PM
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Hello: Linda

Wise idea to keep the appliance you already have. In my opinion.

I know of no specific gas detector, part or safety device to turn off the gas to oven and or stove with oven, as a seperate safety device for that one type of appliance.

Pilot gas odor is not harmful. Nor will pilot gas, when a pilot light is out, cause any problems, fires, explosions, etc. All that needs to be done is to relight the pilot flame.

Gas detector for hanging on a wall but it does not shut off any gas. Works like a carbon monoxide detector. Sounds an alarm only. In my opinion and based upon my many years in the customer appliance service industry for a major nat gas utility, neither alarms are worth the money to buy or worth having. Personal Opinion Only.
 
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Old 10-22-04, 08:20 PM
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I don't have a Tappan stove, but with my 1950's O'Keefe and Merritt stove I have the top burner pilot lights turned off and I use a handheld lighter when I want to light a burner. I think most stoves have individual adjustment screws for each pilot light and you can use them to turn off the pilot light gas supply.

I do the same with my gas space heaters, but then I live in Southern California so I don't use them that much.

John
 
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Old 10-23-04, 08:51 AM
Applescruff
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Pilot gas odor is not harmful. Nor will pilot gas, when a pilot light is out, cause any problems, fires, explosions, etc. All that needs to be done is to relight the pilot flame.
So, if a pilot light went out over-night..........this would NOT leak enough gas to cause an explosion?

After reading more of your answers to posters, I checked the color of the flames from this range. When turned up high, the flames all have quite a bit of orange at the tips. I looked for an air-shutter adjustment screw(?) and all I see is the round circle with pilot light then the round burner tube (?) and then a small kinda pyramid shaped thingy which is what lights each burner. There doesn't seem to be any kind of adjustment here! The burner ring where the flames come out are all clean. The cast iron part under the rings do have some obvious rust. Do I wire-brush this and then vacuum out the mess? Could this be the cause of the orange flame tips?

Thanks again for your time,
Linda
 
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Old 10-30-04, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Applescruff
... I think I am going to get happy with my OLD range (by the way it, cooks great, boils a BIG pot of water in under 5 min) and install a gas detector! Is there any such thing as an automatic shut-off when gas is detected?
Thanks again
Linda
Yes, such devices are used in marine applications. My wife and I used to live on a houseboat, and we definitely had a gas (propane) detector connected to a solenoid valve controlling the supply ... and we got those items from West Marine, as I recall. However, propane is heavier than air (and we had sensors under our appliances and in the bilge), and I am not sure where you might best place a sensor for natural gas (which rises) ...
 
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Old 10-30-04, 09:39 PM
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Hi: Linda

Yes. That is correct. Pilot gas is not sufficient nor has the volume to be any problem or hazard. Even if the appliance had 5 pilot flames all out at the same time in any kitchen, house or apartment. Simply not enough gas volume to cause any fire, explosion, etc. Plenty of odor but not volume.

Which ONLY applies to pilot gas and does NOT apply to gas leaks. Whole different case with leaks. Appliance should be checked by a gas utility rep or professional if any doubts exist that odor is not a pilot out odor.

Orange flames is simply dust and or debris, which may not be visable to the eye, burning. Simply banging on the burners or grates will cause orange flames to appear on any cooking stove or range. Again, not a problem.

I am also familar with vessel (Boats) gas leak detectors. Propane is used on boats. Propane is heavier than nat gas so it settles. Boats have lower decks and spaces beneath the floor boards, etc. Which can collect propane that settles down and does not rise upwards like natural gas. Thus leak detectors are usable and make safety sense on boats but not in homes or kitchens in houses or apartments, etc. Only on boats and like vessels or RV's etc.
 
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Old 10-25-10, 10:26 AM
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Smile Convert it Yourself

Of course you can convert an old gas range to electric! There is nothing magical or mysterious about the process. You simply need a source of spark that you route to near the burner.

There are two ways to generate the spark, electronically and piezoelectrically. Piezo igniters rely on a crystal to generate a spark when you push the button. They don't need batteries and theoretically work forever, but I don't like them as well because the button is hard to push and they only generate one spark per push (so you might need to push them repeatedly). Also, you need one piezo device per burner.

You can also get a battery-powered igniter. These generate sparks repeatedly as long as you push the button and often have multiple ports for igniting several burners.

In your case, a six-burner conversion, I would get a 3-port kit and convert the three burners I use most often. I have also seen 4-port igniters (although not complete kits). In reality though, most people don't use all six burners.

The kit is available on Amazon here: Amazon.com: Grill Care TH804-2062 Universal Electronic Igniter Kit: Patio, Lawn & Garden: Reviews, Prices & more

Hope this helps
 
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Old 11-10-10, 08:12 PM
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S/P this is a 6 year old post. I bet she has already saved enough for her new Viking
 
 

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