Magic Chef Sealed Gas Burners problem


  #1  
Old 02-17-05, 05:09 PM
Magda1ena
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Magic Chef Sealed Gas Burners problem

I have a Magic Chef gas cooktop, it's about 3-4 years old. (magic chef CGC2536) Lately there is a little bit of a gas scent coming from one of the knobs. The problem is that it is a sealed cooktop. There is no way to get inside, _that I can see_, to determine if there is a loose fitting.

Does anybody else have experience with this particular model and repairs? None of the other burners have this issue, just the front left one. (And does this model happen to have the variable power burners? I bought it at an opened box sale, so there was no manual).

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 02-17-05, 05:37 PM
themechanix
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leaking knobs

the fact that a knob leaks is not all that uncommon . constant use tends to loosen seal. gas valves that are turned by knobs typically are coated with lithium grease which over time will dissipate and create a leaking situation. more than likely this will occur with most used burner. taking apart a gas valve to recoat is not something i would suggest anyone but the handiest of folks attempt! but if you still are intent on a DIY repair please reply and detailed instructions will follow.
 
  #3  
Old 02-17-05, 07:02 PM
Magda1ena
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I'm willing to consider it!

We installed this cooktop ourselves, and I've been known to swap out gas hoses myself when they broke/leaked.

What exactly would be involved in this valve fixup thing?

Thank you in advance!
 
  #4  
Old 02-19-05, 02:38 PM
themechanix
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uhmm you get a lot of leaks?

lol. typically newer valves are assembled in 2 ways. either they have 2 small phillips head screws on face or there is brass nut holding front part of valve to body. either way it involves removing cover plate from valves. first thing is to disconnect power {don't want to short out that pesky oven light switch!}. next all knobs will have to be removed some are friction fit some are secured with tiny set screws. next remove the cover plate and you will have access to the valves. at this pont i might suggest a spray bottle solution of 80% dish soap and 20% water and try to isolate leak. if you can find it now it may just be a matter of tightening the connections! turn the burners on and spray the fronts of valves and look for obvious leaking situations. if you see one turn off all other burners and attempt to tighten screws with approprite size screwdriver or nut type with channel-lock pliers. 2 caveats do not over tighten screws and do NOT squeeze too tight on nut. hope this helps some
 
  #5  
Old 02-19-05, 05:24 PM
Magda1ena
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Unhappy Suggestion followup.

Originally Posted by themechanix
lol. typically newer valves are assembled in 2 ways. either they have 2 small phillips head screws on face or there is brass nut holding front part of valve to body. either way it involves removing cover plate from valves. first thing is to disconnect power {don't want to short out that pesky oven light switch!}. next all knobs will have to be removed some are friction fit some are secured with tiny set screws. next remove the cover plate and you will have access to the valves.
Oh dear. That isn't how this cooktop is made. There is a cover plate over the valves for the burners, but once that is off all you get is a piece of circuit board looking stuff under the valve stem, held on with rivets/eyelets. There are no visible screws anywhere. Top that with the fact that any screws to disassemble the stop of the cooktop (built in cooktop, not a range) are on the underside of the unit, inside the cabinet.
Originally Posted by themechanix
at this pont i might suggest a spray bottle solution of 80% dish soap and 20% water and try to isolate leak. if you can find it now it may just be a matter of tightening the connections! turn the burners on and spray the fronts of valves and look for obvious leaking situations. if you see one turn off all other burners and attempt to tighten screws with approprite size screwdriver or nut type with channel-lock pliers. 2 caveats do not over tighten screws and do NOT squeeze too tight on nut. hope this helps some
I tried trickling some bubblewater down inside the valve while it was turned on. There were no bubbles, though I could still smell gas escaping in there. Then the burner right behind it started clicking rapidly as if trying to fire, so the entire cooktop is unplugged for the moment.
I'm a little discouraged, it looks like I'll have to have some big hairy money-grubbing repair guy out here to disassemble the whole bloody thing to fix it. Bah!!
 
 

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