Thermador range burner will not ignite


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Old 09-22-05, 05:17 PM
Steelratt
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Thermador range burner will not ignite

I have a Thermador rdss30 slide in range/oven. The front left burner on the range will not light. Not only that, but it does not even sound as though gas is flowing to the burner. All the other burners work fine, and you can distinctly hear the sound of the gas flowing to them. Could it be the valve, and if so, how does a valve "go bad?" If its not the valve, what else could it be? The ignitor produces a good spark.
 
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Old 09-22-05, 05:47 PM
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Hello Steelratt. Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic and the Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

Chances are the orifice is plugged up, if the valve rotates and no gas comes out of the burner. There are occassions when a burner valve will rotate and not allow gas to flow. In such cases, the valve is defective and must be replaced.

Since there is a remote possibility the burner tube is restricted or plugged, which would than allow gas to flow under to lid, I do not suggest match testing the burner to check for burner flames. Which is a test techs can use once they are sure it is safe to do so.... However, should gas be flowing under the lid and not be known, using a match to check for burner flames can cause major problems..... Use caution.

The burners orifice is located on the top burners gas valve. The lid would have to be raised to access the gas burner valve. Than the burner removed. Than remove the orifice. Once that is removed it can be held up to a light. There will be a small hole in the orifice, which may be restricted or plugged. A pin can be used to clear it, if need be.

Also check the burner tube and be sure it is clear and all the burner ports. Ports are the holes in the burner. May have ignitor ports up a side of the burner head if the spark ignitor is not located directly to the side if the burner head.

Range-Stove-Oven-Broiler Basic Help Information, Fault Codes & Mfg's Web Site Links http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=159808

***Be sure the electrical power to the appliance is turned off, before attempting any repairs. Always check for gas leaks whenever the appliance is moved and/or a repair includes any connection of a gas part.

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Old 09-22-05, 06:16 PM
Steelratt
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I checked the orifice, its clear. I guess that just leaves the valve. Is this something that I can replace? I'm fairly good mechanically, having fixed central a/c units, VCRs, and other appliances in the past. I found the valve online, and its just $20. I'm guessing that having a pro replace it would be hundreds.

Out of curiosity, how exactly does a valve fail? I thought it was a pretty simple mechanical device.
 
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Old 09-22-05, 08:54 PM
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Hello: Steelratt

Out of curiosity, how exactly does a valve fail? I thought it was a pretty simple mechanical device.
Good question. Some valves are made up of several componets. The stem may rotate but the internal core does not. The stem actually turns a disk, which in turn rotates the internal core. Which is why you're likely to hear clicks during rotation.

Most valves screw into the gas manifold. Rotating the valve body counter-clockwise unscrews it. The new valve may or may not come with an orifice. You may have to remove the orifice from the old valve and install it on the new valve.

To insure replacing the removed orifice onto the new valve the same distance outwards, first rotate it inwards on the old valve while counting the number of turns inwards it takes to bottom it out. Than remove it.

Than bottom it out on the new valve and than rotate the orifice outwards the same number of turns it took to bottom it out on the old valve. Doing so helps to insure the burner flames will be equal in size as they are now once the new valve is installed.

Be aware removal may require some minor some valves to be disassembled prior to installation for stem clearance. Remove only the stem holding the valve body intact while installing. A rare instance but may be required.

Some valves are secured onto square manifolds using clips with two screws. On these types there is an "0" ring on the valve which mates up into the manifold and a screw on each side of the clip to secure the valve in place.

For someone like yourself whom is mechanically handy, valve replacement should not pose any major problem. But do proceed with care and use caution. Do not overtighten anything. Use a small amount of thread compound or any light weight oil on the valves threads.

You will need to turn off the gas to the appliance before removing the valve. Once the new valve is installed, turn the gas back on and leak test with leak detection soap before considering the project done.

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