Can valves on Wedgewood stove be serviced?

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Old 01-26-06, 12:33 AM
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Can valves on Wedgewood stove be serviced?

The valves on our Wedgewood stove does not turn smoothly. I removed the knobs and could see through the holes that there are two screws securing the plate which the valve stem comes through. If I remove the screws, can the valves be serviced or made to turn smoother?

Then there's the problem of getting at the valves. The top of the stove wraps over the front in one piece. Opening the oven and broiler doors did not review any screws holding the top down. Is there a trick to getting at the valves?
 
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Old 01-26-06, 07:38 AM
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Hello: Dave

Call the gas company. They will lube or oil the valvess for you free of charges and check all other aspects of the appliance for proper operations. The company will also do likewise for all natural gas appliances. Request appliance(s) servicing through customer services. Phone number on the back of the monthly bill....
 
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Old 01-26-06, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by davelew
The valves on our Wedgewood stove does not turn smoothly. I removed the knobs and could see through the holes that there are two screws securing the plate which the valve stem comes through. If I remove the screws, can the valves be serviced or made to turn smoother?

Then there's the problem of getting at the valves. The top of the stove wraps over the front in one piece. Opening the oven and broiler doors did not review any screws holding the top down. Is there a trick to getting at the valves?
The trick to removing the front panel is having done several...It takes a while to get use to knowing which models have screws and which have a wedge fit.
Do as Sharp advised. I have service many and it is easy to mess up the interior parts of the valve body.
 
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Old 01-26-06, 07:53 PM
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I contacted PG&E and was told that they don't service the appliance valves. They mainly light pilots and adjust gas/air for proper flame color, which are generally easily accessable. Looks like I'll have to tackle it myself.

Since the stove is in N. Calif. and I'm in S. Calif., I won't have an opportunity to work on it until maybe in May or June. For now, I'm just gathering information.

The burner valves looks like a simple package compared to the oven/broiler valves. I'm hoping to disassemble the valves, remove the old grease, re-grease, and reassemble the valves. Is this a reasonable task?

What solvents can be used to clean the valves? Do I need a special grease that's compatable with natural gas? Hi-temp disc brake grease, plain old wheel bearing grease, white lithium base stuff, etc.? Thanks
 
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Old 01-26-06, 08:18 PM
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Hello: Dave

So the stove is in Northern Cal. HUMMM. Correct. They do not offer the same services as the gas company does here in Southern Ca.

Grease type? Use valve lube grease. Purchase at any local appliance store. Or you can force blow oil into the valves. Works most of the time. Basic valve servicing info below:

GREASING TOP BURNER VALVES

The gas valves can be made to turn easily. They have to be oiled or disassembled and greased. However, knowing exactly how to perform this task requires slightly more then handy work.

Below is an excerpt from a prior posting I posted on how to accomplish this task.

There are some types of top burner valves which cannot be successfully taken apart and put back together again. Those types must be replaced with new valves.

These types are gas valves that has preset sized burner flames {High-Medium-Low} and some that have a Simmer setting. Any that click to denote the selection cannot often be successfully disassembled and reassembled. These gas valves are the types that should be completely replaced.

The regreaseable type of valves {but not all} will have two tiny screws holding the valve core in place. This plate is located directly on top of the valve around the stem.

The securing plate may appear to look teardrop shaped to some persons. Basically it will have two oval shaped ears on the ends with two tiny screws holding each end down.

The main gas supply valve behind the stove must be turned off first. Then the two tiny screws, on the valve retaining plate, can be removed. Then simply lift the core out of the valve by holding onto the stem.

Clean the core and the bore it fits into with a cloth only. Use no cleaner, soap or WD-40! Apply a lite weight grease {any type of automotive grease will do} sparingly to the core only.

Put the core back in exactly as you found it. Push it down to be sure it's seated. Reinstall the cover ring and install the two tiny screws. Tighten the screws in carefully.

The valve now should look exactly as it did prior to removal. Rotate the valve on and off several times to spread the grease around and your done with this part.

Repeat the process on any other top burner valve that may also need greasing. Do one valve at a time to avoid confusion, damage to the parts and or mixing up of parts.

Turn on the gas valve behind the stove and soap test for leaks both where you installed the core [on top of the valve} and at the orifice where the back of the burner sits on.

An alternative method to greasing is oiling. To perform this task, turn off the gas at the main gas supply line. Lift the stove top cover and remove the problem burner or burners.

Slip a soft rubber line hose over the brass orifice. Hold the other end of the hose above the orifice and drop into the hose a few drops of 3 in 1 oil.

Then using a slight blow of air from your mouth, blow the oil in the hose into the valve core, while at the same time gently pulling upwards on the valves stem and rotating it on and off.

When this procedure is done correctly, the oil will lube the valve, make it turn freely and help stop gas leakage to the burners when the valve is in the off position.

Should parts be needed, the best source for original replacement parts is your local retail appliance parts store. You can locate the store in the phone book.

For those who may not care to do this task, some natural gas utility companies offer this service. Be reminded that this task is not to be attempted by those whom are not comfortable working with small parts and or gas control parts.
 
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Old 01-26-06, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by davelew
I contacted PG&E and was told that they don't service the appliance valves. They mainly light pilots and adjust gas/air for proper flame color, which are generally easily accessable. Looks like I'll have to tackle it myself.

Since the stove is in N. Calif. and I'm in S. Calif., I won't have an opportunity to work on it until maybe in May or June. For now, I'm just gathering information.

The burner valves looks like a simple package compared to the oven/broiler valves. I'm hoping to disassemble the valves, remove the old grease, re-grease, and reassemble the valves. Is this a reasonable task?

What solvents can be used to clean the valves? Do I need a special grease that's compatable with natural gas? Hi-temp disc brake grease, plain old wheel bearing grease, white lithium base stuff, etc.? Thanks
or


Yes PG&E does grease valves...I worked there 43 years and must have greased 500 million of them give or take a couple. Call back and just say burner won't light. Explain to serviceman what you need upon arrival..Where is the range??
 
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Old 02-06-06, 07:29 PM
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Maybe the lady at PG&E gave me some bad info about not greasing valves. How much time would a PG&E service person spend at each stop? It seems like in order to get at the valves, the top needs to come off first. At this point, I can only guess that there are screws in the back that is holding the top in place.

Taking into consideration the time to disconnect the gas line, move the stove out, get behind it and remove some screws, remove the top, and then grease the valves, and repeat all this in reverse, is this more time and effort a PG&E service tech is willing or authorized to perform? It's definately more involved than just lighting the pilot. If they will do this, what a great utility company! Otherwise, I'll have to do it myself.

Per Sharp's description, the valves appear to be the regreaseable types. There aren't any detents for high, med, or low. There are two small screws holding the valve core in place. I was not able to pull the oven knob off to see that valve head on, but I can see that it is much larger than the four burner valves. Is there a trick to removing a stubborn knob, aside from bruit force? Can the valve be damaged if pulled too hard?

The Wedgewoood stove is in Oakland.

Thanks for your replies.
 
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Old 02-07-06, 06:36 PM
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PG&E does grease valves...No set time for each job..Up to the service rep if job is to much..Normally you only have to turn off gas in rear not attack job from there...yes knobs can be difficult & may be areason to turn job down..You may want to have knobs removed prior to reps arrival.
Does the top lift up on your model? If yes then should not be much of a problem removing front panel
 
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Old 02-08-06, 02:06 AM
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I don't think the top lifts off. When I lift up on the top at the front, nothing moves. There doesn't appear to be any screws at the front that is holding the top down. At least when I open the oven and broiler doors, I don't see any screws securing the top. My best guess is that there are screws at the back that is holding the top in place. And if I can remove those screws, maybe the top will slide forward and then I can lift it off. It's just a guess.

Of course if I can get the top off, I'd grease those valves myself. But I won't be going up to Oakland until maybe Memorial Day.

The stove is in my mother's house. She's had it for over 40 years and would not trade it for a new stove. I think if she called the PG&E guy out, he would say greasing the valves would too labor intensive. Unless there is an easy way of removing the top and I'm not seeing it. Most stoves of that era has a separate front where the valves are. That front can be removed to gain access to the valves. But on our stove, that front piece is part of the top, all one piece.

So I'm trying to get all the details before my next visit. Sure I can probably figure it out, but I don't want it to be an all day job. It would be nice to get the step-by-step directions first.
 
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