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gas stove - orange flame?


zinnia292's Avatar
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03-19-06, 03:44 PM   #1 (permalink)  
gas stove - orange flame?

For the first time I own a gas range, and I really know nothing about it... so please forgive me if this is a silly question!

I have inherited a magic chef stove with my new home, and I'm estimating that it is about 15 years old. The problem is that the flame on the stove top is becoming more and more orange (than blue) with use. I looked at the burner pilot lights and they are blue with an orange tip. Also, there is quite a bit of white powder under the stove top and around the pilot light.

I've decided to stop using the burners until I know what is wrong (just because I'm nervous). I've had the gas company out because I thought I smelled gas, but they couldn't find anything wrong.

Does any of this sound right? Also, can I clean that white powder? If so, should blow out the pilot light? What should I clean it with?

Thanks in advance!!

 
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03-19-06, 06:45 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Hello zinnia292. Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic and the Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

Excellent questions. Not covered in several months and time to repost possible causes for orange flames on the top burners. Most likely cause is simply invisible dust particles burning. As long as the color is orange and not confused with yellow whitish color like a candle flame makes.

For a test try this: When a burner is on and nothing is on the grate, tap the grate with the back end of a knife handle. Just tap or rap it several times. Notice the flame color? More orange than prior. Tapping stirs up more dust from within the surrounding air and debris from the grates causing more orange flames. Nothing uncommon or unsafe. Can recreate this condition on anyones stove burners at any given time. More dust more orange flames. All is than OK.

The whitish power around the pilot lights is caused by products in the natural gas. Usually caused by a high sulfur content. Can also be caused by pilot flames which are too large. Pilots should be no higher the the top of the cup around the pilot flame. Best pilot flame height is only half the height of the surrounding wind protective cup.

Be sure the surrounding pilot wind protective cup are clean and the air openings at the base of the cups are opened and free of debris, etc. Pilot flame color should be blue at the base of the flame and have a tiny yellow tip on the top of the flame.

Too high a pilot flame will create black soot and whitish powder may even be created with low sulfur content in the gas. The pilot flame height and the cups being cleaned out with all openings around the circumference is required to have a clean burning flame with no excessive amounts of whitish powder being created or left behind.

Black soot is never acceptable. The conditions which cause soot will also create odors and burn the top cover of the lid or it's chrome vent cap and/or cause discoloring to the enameled top etc.

To adjust a pilot flame, follow the thin aluminum tubes from the pilots to the black gas supply manifold where the knobs are under the top lid. There will be a tiny set screw. Use a tiny slot bladed screw drive to turn the set screws clock wise to reduce the pilot flames heights or counter clock wise to increase height but only enough so flame height is half to two thirds the height of the protective cup.

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03-19-06, 06:52 PM   #3 (permalink)  
One more question...

Thank you so much for such a quick reply! You've calmed my mind tremendously! I really do think the pilot light is too high (it does seem a bit sooty on the underside of the cooktop on one side), so I'm glad to know that it can be adjusted so easily.

I'm printing your response and I'll give it a try this week (need to go buy a tiny screwdriver!). One more question... should I blow out the pilot light before I try to adjust? I'm assuming yes, but I've never been comfortable about a gas flame, and I just don't want to screw it up!

Thank you again! I'll let you know how it turns out!

 
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03-19-06, 06:55 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Hello: zinnia292

No. Leave the pilot flame burning during adjusting. Turn that set screw clock wise very very slowly while watching the pilot flames height. Only blow out the flame during cup cleaning, etc. Once cleaning is done, relight pilot flame and adjust. Adjusting is the last step, not the first.


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11-23-10, 04:24 AM   #5 (permalink)  
Hi I have recently moved and brought my own gas stove to my rental, I orignially had natural gas, but this property has propane. I had a repairman replace the orfices to propane but now my oven has orange flames shooting out from burner and the oven is filled with black soot. I do not know if the propane tank ran close to empty previously. Can you give me any advice regarding this? Thank you

 
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11-23-10, 11:07 AM   #6 (permalink)  
I imagine that you had to pay the conversion man $100 per hour...1/2 of that could be travel time.
IMO, he should have taken the time to assure that all works as designed...aka good service...
I have had propane tanks run empty without any ill effects.
Doesn't orange result from too little oxygen and that blue is the target??
There is a ton of good info here at doityourself.

 
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11-23-10, 11:47 AM   #7 (permalink)  
I'm not sure about the oxygen issue, I have contacted my propane company about it, they were unsure if low tank may have caused the problem as well. Yes, I did pay someone to hook it up, however, I believe he was in the learning process and probably didn't know that it should burn blue, so I am getting in touch with them again to fix it.

 
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11-24-10, 07:46 AM   #8 (permalink)  
Hello: Elizabeth4045

A low fuel propane tank has nothing to do with flame color. Travel camp trailers have two tanks and an automatic switching device. When one tank runs out, the switching devices automatically switches over to the full tank.

If you consider the above, then there would be visible orange or yellow flames on the propane gas appliances pilots and/or burners when one tanks nears empty. That does not happen, since a low fuel level in one tank before being switched over does not show any visible signs.

You would not even know there had been a switch over to the full tank if you did not manually look at the between the two bottles or tanks gage on many trailers.

Granted, some expensive trailers and/or motor homes do have internal gage's on a control panel to let the user know a tank ran empty but this is not the case on all travel trailers.

Which all boils down to no, flame color will not change as a result of a low or empty tank IMO and based upon my years of experiences.

Problem with your ovens burner is very likely it was NOT re-orificed for the fuel type used and/or not adjusted correctly. A condition that needs to be corrected as soon as possible.

Absolutely NO soot should be produced by any gas appliances burners regardless of which fuel is used. Period. Your service person needs to come back and make it right and do so as soon as possible.


Regards and Good Luck.
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It doesn't function until it's OPEN.........

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Gun safety is using BOTH hands!

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Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
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01-14-11, 06:27 PM   #9 (permalink)  
do you have a humidifier? that caused my propane stove flames orange. shut if off for a couple of hours and check again.

 
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08-06-11, 01:18 PM   #10 (permalink)  
Orange flame Gas Stove

Gas man just left here. Sediment is the cause of my big Orange flames in all our gas powered appliances (heater, water heater, dryer) . "Orange" means sediment, soot, or dust has loosened in the pipes and is running through the pipes burning off when the gas is on. The reason the flames look much larger is because the orange comes to the top of the blue flame giving it the appearance to be larger. And he was correct. The flames are slowly getting back to all blue as the sediment settles. The flames are the same size, but the blue makes it appear to be smaller flame in certain lighting. All it takes is a slight tap on the gas pipe outside, or inside your house for that to happen.
AS for the Yellow, He said that the yellow flame is the indication of a combustion issue. If there is any Yellow flame even mixed in with the orange and blue, then definitely your gas people for emergency help. Hope that helps.

 
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